Search Results
First Aired - 10/24/2010 12:00PM Download MP3 (Full Episode)
Hosted By
The-main-course
Sponsored by
360
This week on The Main Course Patrick and Katy sat down with Marion Nestle: activist, professor, and author of "What to Eat", "Safe Food", and "Food Politics". Joining the conversation was Joan Dye Gussow, another world-renowned activist in the academic and government sectors as well as the author of "This Organic Life". Together Nestle and Dye Gussow constitute an amazing meeting of the minds when it comes to championing all things sustainable, and affecting change in broken food and distribution systems, failed academic institutions, and obsolete ideas. The gang discussed food politics at large, the sticky situation of labeling food, and how to make the public see that public health is attached to domestic food policy. This episode was sponsored by 360Cookware.com.

Photo 1: Marion Nestle, Photo 2: Joan Dye Gussow

Jump to Segment:
Tags:
Joan Dye Gussow, Growing, Older: A Chronicle of Death, Life, and Vegetables, Marion Nestle, Paulette Goddard Professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University, Feed Your Pet Right, Safe Food: The Politics of Food Safety, Marion is working on a book about Calories, what have the biggest changes in food been over the past few decades?, you can get food now!, 20 years ago you couldn't find good food, the quality of food has gotten better, there's always been junk food, there were no supermarkets before World War II, food philosophy, production vs distribution, marketing, high fructose corn syrup, soda tax is a very progressive idea, developments yet to come, income equity needs to change, environmental issues, symptoms of sickness in our culture, Fiji Water, delusions of being green,
Tags:
progressive agriculture in Rhode Island, Rhody Fresh, dairy cooperative, tourism model, Carlo Petrini's legacy is his university, Patrick wants his legacy to be better the animal welfare situation in our country, UCSF, nutrition department, Joan told a story about seeing mushrooms from Missouri and other items from foreign places in Hawaii, this story changed Marion's life, Joan wants her legacy to be as a truth teller, Joan's new book, Growing, Older, dealing with the death of a partner, Marion's legacy will be food studies, from concept to state approval in 9 months, she founded the food studies department, K. Dun Gifford, Mediterranean diet issues, food systems, food & culture, food history, Amy Bentley, food historian from Colorado, what's the takeaway of the NYU food studies program?, you learn how to read write and think food, there are now many food studies programs, what role will academia play in making change?, Joan thinks very little, Cornell Bread, in World War II Clive McCay invented a health food bread, it's hard to say what you think until you have tenure, social movements, you can never tell what the causes or consequences are, collectively the food movement is focused on producing a system better for the environment and our health, terribly fragmented right now, get students to think critically about the world they are in, make the world a better place, food advocacy, book recommendations:, Omnivore's Dilemma, Food Rules, In Defense of Food, all of Marion and Joan's work, sweet potatoes,

To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

First Aired - 10/03/2010 12:00PM Download MP3 (Full Episode)
Hosted By
The-main-course
Sponsored by
Fairway
This week on The Main Course Patrick and Katie take a look at some folks who have rejected a broken food distribution network and created their own. Scott Boggs of The Breslin stops by to describe his past as a butcher ("before it was cool") and how he's currently benefiting from growing food locally and selling it at NYC restaurants. Liza Shaw of A16 in San Francisco speaks on how they've taken the ideas of local sourcing and seasonal menus from Italy to the West Coast, and why their customers are coming back to try new things. Finally Daniel Imhoff, Editor of "CAFO: The Tragedy of Industrial Animal Factories" calls in to talk about why we need to fight back against industrial feed lots with anti-biotics legislation, local farming, and realism about the devastating health consequences of factory farmed animals. This episode was sponsored by Fairway: like no other market.

Photo 1: Breslin on W 29th St. in NYC, Photo 2: Liza Shaw of A16 Restaurant in San Francisco, Photo 3: "CAFO: The Tragedy of Industrial Animal Factories", edited by Daniel Imhoff

Jump to Segment:
Tags:
CAFO: The Tragedy of Industrial Animal Factories, The Foundation for Deep Ecology, Daniel Imhoff, Plundering Appalachia, what is happening with industrialization of animals for food, Matthew Scully, investigative journalists, Michael Pollan, it's very difficult to get access to animal factories, Daniel bought a majority of the photos from the AP, limited access for photographers, Confined Animal Feeding Operations, Oprah Winfrey, how much of America's meat dairy and eggs are produced in CAFOs?, the top 5% of the big livestock corporations produce 50% of all animal products in the US, flooding the market with cheap commodities, fast food is not cheaper!, is it that much cheaper to raise livestock in such an industrial manner?, health impacts, Daniel raises small livestock for his family, conscious omnivore, Diet for a Small Planet, health is something we can all agree on, high rates of saturated fats are linked to grain fed industrially raised animals, pay your farmer or pay the hospital, battling obesity, how can we change the model and still feed all Americans?, antibiotic legislation, there are 800 million hungry people in the world and 1 billion obese people, trade blogs, Heritage Foods USA is a solution!, perennial based pastured based agriculture, water filtration, Wendell Berry, return to animal husbandry,

To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

First Aired - 09/20/2009 12:00PM Download MP3 (Full Episode)
Hosted By
The-main-course
Sponsored by
Hearst_logo
This week, Patrick & Katy are joined by renegade school lunch lady Ann Cooper & author/historian Andrew F. Smith.
Jump to Segment:
Tags:
school lunches, Ann Cooper, Whole Foods, sustainability, children, private schools, New York City, Harlem, Alice Waters, Director of Nutrition Services, Boulder, Colorado, Food Family Farming Foundation, East Hampton, New School, regional organic, multi generational, Director of Wellness and Nutrition, Tom Harkin, health care debate, Kathleen Merrigan, Arnie Duncan, food distributors, small budget, food, finance, facilities, human resources and marketing, junk food, free lunches, chicken nuggets, corn dogs, national school lunch program started in the 1960's, national security, some young men were so malnourished, they were unable to serve in the military, using policy to change policy, USDA, Denver, school board, concerned parents, nonprofit advocates, private funding, government commodity food program, Berkley,
Tags:
what are the changes, budget increase, school lunch programs could use another $1 per child, school districts can make change with the budget they have by doing a full budget assessment, salad bars, whole grain bread, regional milk, Hearst Ranch, the meat that froms from the USDA is bottom of the barrell, contamination issues, fair pricing, selling leftover product to schools, local burritos, Colorado milk, farming classes, hands on experience, local produce, there are no laws against choosing your source in school lunch programs, regional distributers, Obama administration, Michelle Obama, a week in the life of Ann Cooper, Beth Collins, childhood obesity, slow food, culinary students, tuition reimbursment for working at schools, cooking and gardening classes, marketing campaigns for healthy food, Hillary Clinton, Tom Vilsack, the squeaky wheel gets the oil, Michael Pollan, http://www.thelunchbox.org/, protein, procurement, how can we improve meats in school?, advice for distributors,
Tags:
Tisch, NYU, Hearst Ranch, Carlo Petrini, Andrew F. Smith, the evolution of food in the United States, food history, colonial period, Civil War, canning revolution, blowfish, food for people going on long sailing trips, condensed meat, meat patties, Gail Borden, conservation, canned food helped urban and poor families, Alice Waters, frozen food, World War II, refrigeration revolution, Vitamin C, lemons, oranges, sales skyrocketed in the 1920's and 30's, fresh squeezed orange juice, California, soda is one of the leading cause of obesity in this country, science food, Fruit Loops, high fructose, snack food, Cracker Jack is the first national junk food, street vendors, canning used to be elite, 1 in 4 kids died from tuberculosis before the age of 5 because of bad milk, refrigerated train cars,
Tags:
snack foods go national through advertising, labels for canned food, Quaker Oats, turning points in American food history, Oliver Evans, grist mill, making mills automatic with pulleys, elevators, and buckets, grain into flour, processed food, Laura Ingalls Wilder, The Civil War, using food as a weapon, the South lost because the food supply was cut off, Victory Gardens, fast food, the hamburger started as the Hamburg steak, New Haven, surge of ethnic populations, New York Times, minced meat, meat loaf, TV dinners, packaging was shaped like TV's coincidentally, the product was not meant to eat in front of TV's, family dinners in front of the television, marketing, advertising, Campbell's, milling, WW2, WWII, Germany, immigration, continuous processing, German immigrants used beef remains to create the Hamburg steak,

To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER

PARTNERS
FEATURED EVENTS