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Is milk "nature's perfect food"? This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is joined by cookbook historian Anne Mendelson to debunk this myth. Anne is the author of Milk: The Surprising Story of Milk Through the Ages, a cookbook and overview of milk's history. Learn about milk's volatile chemistry, the differences between different mammals' milks, and Anne's thoughts on the raw milk debate. Also, Anne explains the beginnings of the pasteurization and homogenization processes, and how it changed the lives of urban dwellers in the late 1800s. Hear about modern pasteurization processes, from small to large scale. This program has been brought to you by Cain Winery.

"It [milk] is intended to be supplied in one particularly way, and one alone...under those circumstances it is quite safe to drink, even if it's raw. But if you divert it, if you interrupt that closed system... it changes as soon as you divert it into the outside world; you've already interrupted nature the moment you do that."

"Raw milk's sales allow farmers to sell directly to consumers without a middle man. And it's one of the ways that farmers can sell their product for a price so that they can make a living."

--Anne Mendelson on A Taste of the Past


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How do you indigenize a food? What are the hummus wars? Tune in to a food identity themed episode of A Taste of the Past as Linda Pelaccio chats with Ari Ariel, Assistant Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at NYU. Tune in to learn how cuisine is shared and sometimes protected in different countries and cultures. Learn what makes a dish "authentic" and how hummus has caused such a fuss between nations. This program was sponsored by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"Migration provokes changes in foodways."

"I think in America we all understand that nothing is truly authentic."

"The word hummus is just the Arab word for chick pea, it has nothing to do with preparation."

--Ari Ariel, Assistant Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at NYU on A Taste of the Past


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Hooked on Downton Abbey? Curious what food was like during the Edwardian Period? Tune in to an especially historic episode of A Taste of the Past with Linda Pelaccio as she is joined by Cathy Kaufman, chair of the Culinary Historians of New York. Find out why English food has a rich tradition and why it gets such a bad reputation these days. Learn about early haute cuisine, table settings, cookbooks and the important of the dining room as it relates to the period of time featured on Downton Abbey. This program is sponsored by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"English food at that time [The Edwardian Era] had fabulous butter, cream and meats. The houses all had wonderful gardens. There was no reason for the food not to be good. English food gets its bad reputation because of the true hardships with food rationing that the population underwent after World War I, The Great Depression and World War II."

"In England unlike in the US, while you would have some flowers and silver candelabra, it would not be overly profuse. I think there's an interesting juxtaposition between American and English tables at this time. The American table is rather gaudy by comparison."

--Cathy Kaufman, Chair of the Culinary Historians of New York on A Taste of The Past


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