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Hooked on Downton Abbey? Curious what food was like during the Edwardian Period? Tune in to an especially historic episode of A Taste of the Past with Linda Pelaccio as she is joined by Cathy Kaufman, chair of the Culinary Historians of New York. Find out why English food has a rich tradition and why it gets such a bad reputation these days. Learn about early haute cuisine, table settings, cookbooks and the important of the dining room as it relates to the period of time featured on Downton Abbey. This program is sponsored by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"English food at that time [The Edwardian Era] had fabulous butter, cream and meats. The houses all had wonderful gardens. There was no reason for the food not to be good. English food gets its bad reputation because of the true hardships with food rationing that the population underwent after World War I, The Great Depression and World War II."

"In England unlike in the US, while you would have some flowers and silver candelabra, it would not be overly profuse. I think there's an interesting juxtaposition between American and English tables at this time. The American table is rather gaudy by comparison."

--Cathy Kaufman, Chair of the Culinary Historians of New York on A Taste of The Past


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This week on A Taste of the Past host Linda Pelaccio talks with food writer and interviewer Monica Bhide who has written on a variety of subjects from Indian cooking to her latest venture into the world of e-publishing with her newest e-book, "In Conversation with Exceptional Women". Learn about her tips for gaining inspiration in both cooking and writing, her views on authenticity and Indian cooking, as well as where she sees the realm of digital publishing heading. This episode is sponsored by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"It really raises the question of what is real cooking and what is real food. And, to me, anything that is prepared with love and that is intended to nurture the people that it's prepared for is real cooking."

--Monica Bhide on A Taste of the Past


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Bob Martin is the director of Food System Policy at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future and guest lecturer at the school. Formerly, he was a senior officer at the Pew Environment Group and was the Executive Director of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production, a two year study funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts by a grant to Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The charge to the Commission was to recommend solutions to the problems caused by concentrated animal feeding operations in the areas of public health, the environment, rural communities, and animal welfare. The Commission’s final report, Putting Meat on the Table: Industrial Farm Animal Production in America, was release on April 28, 2008. This week on What Doesn't Kill You, Katy Keiffer talks with Bob about the report, and its findings on antibiotics in livestock agriculture, waste management, contract growing, and more! Thanks to our sponsor, Cain Vineyard & Winery. Music by Dead Stars.

"I think the conclusion of the report said it best - change will come from a more informed and aggressive consumer." [34:45]

-- Bob Martin on What Doesn't Kill You

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