S H O W  S C H E D U L E
SUNDAY
12:OO - 12:45 /// The Main Course
1:OO-1:3O /// Eat Your Words
2:OO-2:3O /// Arts & Seizures
3:OO-4:OO /// The Morning After
4:3O-5:3O /// Snacky Tunes
6:OO-6:3O /// Joshua David Stein Variety Hour...Half Hour
MONDAY
1O:OO-1O:3O /// Wild Game Domain
11:OO-11:3O /// Inside School Food
12:OO-12:3O /// What Doesn't Kill You
1:OO-1:3O /// Tech Bites
2:OO-2:3O /// Radio Cherry Bombe
3:OO-3:4O /// We Dig Plants
5:OO-5:3O /// Cutting the Curd
6:OO-6:3O /// Animal Instinct
7:OO-7:3O /// Fuhmentaboudit!
8:OO-8:3O /// Eating Disorder
TUESDAY
12:OO-12:45 /// Cooking Issues
1:OO-1:3O /// Let's Get Real
2:OO-2:3O /// Sharp & Hot
3:OO-3:3O /// The Food Seen
4:OO-4:3O /// Greenhorns Radio
5:OO-5:45 /// Beer Sessions Radio (TM)
7:OO-7:3O /// Roberta's Radio
WEDNESDAY
1O:OO - 1O:3O /// In the Drink
11:OO-11:3O /// Taste Matters
12:OO-12:45 /// Chef's Story
1:OO - 1:3O /// After the Jump
2:OO-2:45/// WORD OF MOUTH
3:OO-3:3O /// The Speakeasy
4:OO-4:45 /// All in the Industry
5:OO-5:45 /// Cereal
THURSDAY
11:OO - 11:3O /// Native
12:OO - 12:3O /// A Taste of the Past
1:OO - 1:3O /// The Farm Report
3:OO-3:3O /// Eating Matters
4:OO - 5:OO /// Food Talk with Mike Colameco
6:OO-6:45 /// Mama Coco's Funky Kitchen
7:3O-8:3O /// Full Service Radio
9:OO-1O:3O /// GUNWASH
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Evolutionaries
My Welcome Table
How Great Cities Are Fed
Gastropod
the business of The Business
PUNCH Radio
The Whole Shebang
Edible Alphabet
Heritage Breeds
PAST PROGRAMS
Manhattan Cocktail Classic Coverage Pizza Party
No Chefs Allowed
Anastasia's Fridge
It's More Than Food
Straight from the Source
Metropolitan Ave
Summer of Food
HRN on Sandy
Micology
Everything's On the Table
Hot Grease
U Look Hungry
The Naturalist
Burning Down the House
Search Results
Hosted By
Eating-matters
Sponsored by
Cain-logotype-hrn-150
This week on the third installment of the Prescribing Food series, host Kim Kessler welcomes Dr. Deborah Frank to Eating Matters, discussing the connection between food and healthcare. Kim asks Dr. Frank about her incredible background and how it led her to found and direct the Grow Clinic for Children at the Boston Medical Center, where malnourished kids and their families are helped by a team of doctors, social workers, and nutritionists. She goes on to share details about Children's HealthWatch and that while malnutrition in children is not incredibly rare in the United States, it does exist and deserves to be addressed. Later in the show, Kim gets the scoop on the Preventive Food Pantry housed at the Boston Medical Center. The Food Pantry works to address nutrition-related illness and under-nutrition for low-income patients. It fills the therapeutic gap by linking physicians and nutritionists to patients. Individuals with special nutritional needs are referred to the Pantry by Boston Medical Center primary care providers who write “prescriptions” for supplemental foods that best promote physical health, prevent future illness and facilitate recovery. The Pantry is often used by patients with cancer, HIV/AIDS, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, obesity, food allergies and other chronic conditions. Tune in for a great show! This program was brought to you by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"I did a fellowship with Dr. T. Berry Brazelton in child development and realized that poor nutrition was one of the preventable and treatable causes of learning and behavioral difficulties." [1:42]

"Food is medicine." [28:45]

--Dr. Deborah Frank on Eating Matters


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Hosted By
Snacky-tunes
Sponsored by
Robertas
Today on Snacky Tunes we have host Darin Bresnitz interviewing Chef and Owner of Coppa and Toro in Boston, Jamie Bissonnette. Even as a child, Bissonnette was drawn to the kitchen eschewing cartoons for cooking shows on the Discovery Channel. With this early start, he earned his Culinary Arts degree from The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale by the young age of 19 and spent his early 20s eating and cooking his way through Paris, San Francisco, New York and Phoenix. These early experiences fed his culinary drive, teaching him expression through his daily-changing menus. They discuss his latest book 'The New Charcuterie Cookbook: Exceptional Cured Meats to Make and Serve at Home', along with his journey from a young assistant chef to the owner of a famous restaurant in Boston.

Today's musical guest is Psychic Twin. They discuss the band's formation and their latest EP 'Two Visions'. This show is brought to you by Edwards & Sons

"I used to cook with a lot of anger and the dishes just didn't taste pleasant," [20:00]

"In my personal life I don't eat a lot of meat anymore." [21:20]

--Jamie Bissonnette on Snacky Tunes

"I started having panic attacks and ultimately realized that i was probably seriously suppressing my need to move forward with music and move away from what I had going on before." [42:30]

--Erin Fein on Snacky Tunes


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Hosted By
The-food-seen-new
Sponsored by
Wfm
On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Chef Jeremy Sewall retraces his New England roots, from Samuel Sewall at the Salem Witch Trials, to generations of fishermen in Maine, like his Cousin Mark who supplies his restaurants of all their lobster. The name of his first restaurant couldn’t be more apropos, as Lineage literally sit a block away from Sewall Ave in Brookline MA. What Jeremy’s done with his fresh perspective for a regional cuisine oft relying heavily on historical dishes from the Puritans, is anew in The New England Kitchen (cookbook). He celebrates a contemporary cast of farmers and thinkers, from Skip & Shore of Island Creek Oysters, his co-collaborators from Island Creek Oyster Bar , to his newest Fort Point oyster bar, Row 34, which pours Maine Beer Company brews. What’s not lost is Jeremy’s sense of place. He still holds Boston’s past (and the Red Sox) near and dear to his heart. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

"What I'm proudest of in Lineage is that it's truly a neighborhood restaurant." [16:00]

"Fall has this great feeling of relief. The summer's over, the leaves are changing and that kind of dictates how you cook and how you eat. You start to crave things that are warming and hearty." [27:00]

--Jeremy Sewall on The Food Seen


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