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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Patrick Martins, founder of Heritage Foods USA, and our dear radio station HeritageRadioNetwork.org, has authored his first book (with the help of another host of HRN, Mike Edison of Art & Seizures), In “The Carnivore’s Manifesto“, Patrick explains how to eat well, responsibly, and eat meat. A collection of edifying essays, further reenforcing our need to play an active role in the sustainable food movement, to assure a better (and more delicious) world in the future. This program was brought to you by Edwards VA Ham.

"What terroir is to the soil, tetoir is the mind." 19:00

"Meat should be expensive......when somebody's eating BBQ spare ribs 6 nights a week, that's a no no." [25:00]

"The nose to tail movement is a romantic movement but the bigger more powerful movement is grounding up the meat - allowing people to have 31 pound bags of ground lamb in the freezer." [26:00]

"We live in a culture where mediocrity is accepted just because the people are well intentioned." [36:00]

"People who argue for ag-gag laws are un-American." [38:00]

--Patrick Martins on The Food Seen


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Adam Shprintzen discusses 19th Century vegetarianism in his book, The Vegetarian Crusade. This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio talks with Adam about the roots of meat abstention in the 19th Century with the British Bible Christians. How was vegetarianism related to the American Reform Movement and the murmurings of temperance? Tune into this episode to find out how the American Vegetarian Society organized disparaging groups of non-meat eaters. Have vegetarians faced vitriol throughout history? Learn how food entrepreneurs like Harvey Kellogg and Sylvester Graham helped spur on the spread of vegetarianism. What are the parallels between 19th Century vegetarianism and its form in the modern day? Find out all of this and more on this week's edition of A Taste of the Past! Thanks to our sponsor, Consider Bardwell. Music by Obey City.

"The 19th Century was not only a time when people were thinking about reform, but also a time when people were thinking about ways to live a better life. People were abstaining from alcohol, rethinking sexual relationships with the 'free love' movement... It only makes sense that people were also considering changing their diets." [6:00]

"Today, vegetarianism is marketed in a very personal way!" [31:25]

-- Adam Shprintzen on A Taste of the Past


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The stat sheet on hemp sounds almost too good to be true: its fibers are among the planet’s strongest, its seed oil the most nutritious, and its potential as an energy source vast and untapped. Its one downside? For nearly a century, it’s been illegal to grow industrial cannabis in the United States–even though Betsy Ross wove the nation’s first flag out of hemp fabric, Thomas Jefferson composed the Declaration of Independence on it, and colonists could pay their taxes with it. But as the prohibition on hemp’s psychoactive cousin winds down, one of humanity’s longest-utilized plants is about to be reincorporated into the American economy. Get ready for the newest billion-dollar industry. This week's guest is Doug Fine, a man who knows his hemp. In his latest book, Hemp Bound:Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Next Agricultural Revolution, Doug embarks on a humorous yet rigorous journey to meet the men and women who are testing, researching, and pioneering hemp’s applications for the twenty-first century. Tune in to this episode of What Doesn't Kill You as Doug goes from A-Z on hemp and makes a serious case for this serious crop. This program was brought to you by Consider Bardwell.

"Hemp is any variety of the cannabis plant that has .3% or less of THC." [02:00]

"There are farmers making money growing hemp and americans know it know - that's why it's coming back." [08:00]

"I think we're going to have a world leading [hemp] industry here very very soon." [10:00]

--Doug Fine on What Doesn't Kill You


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