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Food Talk with Mike Colameco is brought to you by the following generous underwriters:



This week on Food Talk, Mike has a full house. His first guest, Ellen Gustafson is a food activist and author of the new book, We the Eaters. Mike talks to Ellen about the politics behind why it is difficult to find and eat nutritious food. The two go back and forth regarding possible solutions to the problem, starting with a single item on your dinner plate. Next up, Mike brings in Patrick Martins, Founder and Chairman of Heritage Radio Network as well as the host of The Main Course, to talk about his new book The Carnivore's Manifesto: Eating Well, Eating Responsibly, and Eating Meat. In the book, Patrick highlights fifty ways to be an enlightened carnivore, while taking better care of our planet and ourselves. For the remainder of the program, Mike welcomes Anna Polonsky, US Director of Le Fooding, to share details on the Le Fooding events happening in NYC this summer, including their Beach Club party going down at Rockaway Beach July 11, 12, and 13. Tune in for a packed program!

"We have this dual problem both related to how we nourish ourselves... American eaters have incredible power in the food system. We have dictated what the world eats. Our diet has spread around the world." [7:34]

--Ellen Gustafson on Food Talk

"Should we be eating less meat? Yes, probably. We should be eating less commodity meats." [40:03]

--Patrick Martins on Food Talk

"Le Fooding, in the meantime, never wanted to put stars or grades, because our interests are more about telling stories." [56:41]

--Anna Polonsky on Food Talk


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Tasteofthepast
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This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda welcomes Cindy Lobel to the program. Cindy is an assistant professor of history at Lehman College, a cultural historian with interests in urban development and consumer culture as well as the history of New York. Today she and Linda discuss her book, Urban Appetites: Food and Culture in Nineteenth-Century New York. Was New York City the first in the country to have a restaurant? What was the first restaurant to open in New York City? Surprisingly, it seems as though present day New York food scene is not so different than it was in the 1800s. Tune in as Cindy takes us through the beginnings of restaurants in New York City and how the now flourishing industry evolved through the years. This program has been sponsored by Cain Vineyard and Winery.

"People think that New York was born with the Zagat Guide, and that of course is not the case... free standing restaurants have a history in New York." [5:40]

"The rise of restaurants is really tied to the growth of the city." [8:10]

-- Cindy Lobel on A Taste of the Past


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This week on The Morning After, Host Jessie Kiefer welcomes back Co-Host Sari Kamin after her European excursion! Erin Sylvester also joins the program for a special ode to a beloved restaurant. In the first half of the show, the duo bring on Katrina Moore, director of the documentary, Under the Mango Tree: Food, Health, and Love in Ghana. What started out as a school trip to Ghana, Katrina became inspired by a Ghanian doctor, Dr. Abdulai, struggling to care for his community against all odds. She then decided to turn the experience into a meaningful way to fulfill her Master's thesis in New York University's Food Studies program. After creating an IndieGogo account to raise necessary funds, the project has started to garner support from around the world. Check out the link here to contribute. Later, Sari shares all about her adventures eating around Europe! Tune in for a packed show. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

"The doctor [Dr. Abdulai] saw that the homeless tended to behave very wildly in the streets. They would steal food from the women in the markets...they would be very violent...so the doctor would see that and named it as hunger because he knew hunger. He grew up hungry on the streets of Tamale himself." [18:06]

"The title Under the Mango Tree comes from the doctor's first surgery at the clinic location... The first surgery performed before there were any buildings was performed under this huge mango tree that now provides food and shade and beauty to the clinic grounds." [22:31]

-- Katrina Moore on The Morning After


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