Search Results
Hosted By
Business
Sponsored by
Untitled-2
Amber Lambke gives us a state of the grains field report from her office at Maine Grains Alliance in Skowhegan, ME.

By Laura del Campo


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

Hosted By
The-farm-report
Sponsored by
Wfm
Get ready to learn a whole lot about grains on a special episode of The Farm Report. Erin Fairbanks is joined by Amber Lambke, Executive Director of the Maine Grains Alliance and host of the annual KNEADING Conference. Amber knows her grains and talks about everything from infrastructure to economics. The Maine Grains Alliance's mission is to preserve and promote grain traditions, from earth to hearth. They provide opportunities to learn and share how best to grow and use grains, using a combination of traditional, innovative, and sustainable techniques. The KNEADING conference brings together farmers, professional and home bakers, chefs, cooks, grain researchers, maltsters, food entrepreneurs, and wood-fired oven enthusiasts to educate one another about the art and science of growing and milling grains and baking artisan breads. Over the next 5-10 years the landscape of grains will change dramatically. Find out why on The Farm Report. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

"What we're finding is that grains make a lot of sense in a diversified crop rotation. Many farmers starting to sell us grains also sell other things." [7:13]

"We lost grain production to an economy of scale that made it cheaper to grow high yielding varieties of grain in the midwest." [9:19]

"In the US right now the percentage of organic grain production happening is still less than 1% of the grain production in our country. We have an opportunity in New England to stay focused on organic and non-GMO grain production." [12:17]

"Over the next 5-10 years the landscape of grains will change dramatically. We're not just buying white flour, we're paying a lot more attention to what we're buying." [24:53]

--Amber Lambke on The Farm Report


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

Hosted By
The-farm-report
Sponsored by
Fairway
This week on The Farm Report, Erin ushers in blueberry season! She welcomes Ed Flanagan, CEO of Wyman's of Maine to the program. Wyman's of Maine is a family owned company that specializes in the growing and marketing of wild blueberries. At the top of the show, Ed explains that Wyman's of Maine believes in the Japanese philosophy known as "kaizen," roughly translated as continuous improvement. Simply put: Wyman's has to do all they can to grow their business. Erin and Ed then delve in to discuss the details of the blueberry business, beginning with the distinctions between the wild and cultivated blueberry, Wyman's approach to the growing season, as well as the topic of honey bees and how vital they are to the business. With concerns such as colony collapse disorder, a strange phenomenon where worker bees abruptly disappear, Ed explains how Wyman's had to research, adapt and become invested in bee-keeping to further sustain their livelihood. Grab a smoothie and tune in for a great discussion on the super fruit! This program was sponsored by Fairway Market.

"A wild blueberry is much smaller, about three times smaller, than a cultivated blueberry. Generally, the flavor of a fruit is condensed around the skin, so in a handful of wild blueberries you're going to get more flavor." [7:14]

"We aspire to get to that point someday where we absolutely need no preventative chemicals." [12:50]

"What happened for us that was pretty good luck was right about the time that blueberries were being regarded as a healthy food was just about the same time that people started drinking smoothies." [19:45]

"We are out of business if there are no honey bees to put in our fields." [26:26]

--Ed Flanagan on The Farm Report


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER

PARTNERS
FEATURED EVENTS