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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Adam H. Weinert, a dancer and choreographer, takes the teachings of Ted Shawn, a pioneer of American modern dance, and inflects the agrarian ideals first conceptualized at Jacob’s Pillow, initially a farm property in the Berkshires, now home to America’s longest running dance festival. How does the physical labor of farming inform the movements of modern dance? Find out on The Food Seen! This program was brought to you by Rolling Press.

"Space and time are very important to dance. moving bodies through space and time is what dance is." [12:00]

--Adam Weinert on The Food Seen


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This week on The Morning After, Host Jessie Kiefer welcomes back Co-Host Sari Kamin after her European excursion! Erin Sylvester also joins the program for a special ode to a beloved restaurant. In the first half of the show, the duo bring on Katrina Moore, director of the documentary, Under the Mango Tree: Food, Health, and Love in Ghana. What started out as a school trip to Ghana, Katrina became inspired by a Ghanian doctor, Dr. Abdulai, struggling to care for his community against all odds. She then decided to turn the experience into a meaningful way to fulfill her Master's thesis in New York University's Food Studies program. After creating an IndieGogo account to raise necessary funds, the project has started to garner support from around the world. Check out the link here to contribute. Later, Sari shares all about her adventures eating around Europe! Tune in for a packed show. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

"The doctor [Dr. Abdulai] saw that the homeless tended to behave very wildly in the streets. They would steal food from the women in the markets...they would be very violent...so the doctor would see that and named it as hunger because he knew hunger. He grew up hungry on the streets of Tamale himself." [18:06]

"The title Under the Mango Tree comes from the doctor's first surgery at the clinic location... The first surgery performed before there were any buildings was performed under this huge mango tree that now provides food and shade and beauty to the clinic grounds." [22:31]

-- Katrina Moore on The Morning After


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This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio talks about the history of ramen in Japan and the United States with George Solt, author of The Untold History of Ramen. Tune into this episode to learn how international relations and trade agreements allowed ramen to evolve in Japan using non-traditional ingredients. How do ramen noodles different from other Japanese noodle soups like soba? How did ramen preparations change in order to satisfy the caloric needs of the Japanese population. Tune into this program to learn more about the first instances of instant ramen, ramen museum, and the dish's nutritional value! Are ramen shops in Japan as popular as their equivalents in the United States today? Tune in to find out! Thanks to our sponsor, S. Wallace Edwards & Sons. Music by Pamela Royal.

"Until the introduction of Western food culture en mass in the 19th Century, the Japanese didn't eat much meat; it was much more of fish and vegetable type of eating culture... It shows how politics, international relations, and trade affect food culture." [6:50]

"The pushcart is really the site that the ramen phenomenon came from." [9:20]

-- George Solt on A Taste of the Past


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