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This week on The Morning After, Host Jessie Kiefer welcomes back Co-Host Sari Kamin after her European excursion! Erin Sylvester also joins the program for a special ode to a beloved restaurant. In the first half of the show, the duo bring on Katrina Moore, director of the documentary, Under the Mango Tree: Food, Health, and Love in Ghana. What started out as a school trip to Ghana, Katrina became inspired by a Ghanian doctor, Dr. Abdulai, struggling to care for his community against all odds. She then decided to turn the experience into a meaningful way to fulfill her Master's thesis in New York University's Food Studies program. After creating an IndieGogo account to raise necessary funds, the project has started to garner support from around the world. Check out the link here to contribute. Later, Sari shares all about her adventures eating around Europe! Tune in for a packed show. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

"The doctor [Dr. Abdulai] saw that the homeless tended to behave very wildly in the streets. They would steal food from the women in the markets...they would be very violent...so the doctor would see that and named it as hunger because he knew hunger. He grew up hungry on the streets of Tamale himself." [18:06]

"The title Under the Mango Tree comes from the doctor's first surgery at the clinic location... The first surgery performed before there were any buildings was performed under this huge mango tree that now provides food and shade and beauty to the clinic grounds." [22:31]

-- Katrina Moore on The Morning After


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On this episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is talking with cooking instructor, author and founder of LaVarenne Cooking School, Anne Willan. Anne's cookbook, The Cookbook Library, includes cooking instructions from four centuries of recipe history. Tune in to hear about cooking instructions from all over Europe throughout the ages, the history of dining utensils, and the role of illustrations in cooking manuals. Hear about some of the difficulties involved with recreating dishes from the 15th or 16th century. Anne has collected over 5,000 cookbooks, and you can find some excerpts of these gems of cookbook history in The Cookbook Library! This program has been brought to you by White Oak Pastures.

"It's wonderful because the whole of Europe was interested in writing down and recording what they were eating."

"The oldest recipes were the most difficult to recreate because hard to know just what ingredients tasted like and what people were getting, so it was kind of a bit of a guess. What I wanted to do was to present something that's feasible in a modern kitchen."

--Anne Willan on A Taste of the Past


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Michel Richard is an author, industry advocate, philanthropist, and legendary chef. Known as a pioneer of French food in America, the Brittany native knew he wanted to be a chef at 8, when he first glimpsed a restaurant kitchen. At 14, Richard apprenticed at a patisserie in Champagne, moving to Paris three years later, where he quickly rose to the top position at Gaston Lenotre’s esteemed pastry shop. In 1974, he moved to America to help open a Manhattan shop with Lenotre and found himself at home in a new country. Three years later, he opened Michel Richard in Los Angeles—it was an instantaneous success. A decade later, Richard opened the stylized and quintessentially French-Californian Citrus and the following year was inducted into James Beard’s “Who’s Who of Food and Beverage in America.” Richard then opened a series of restaurants across the country, and even in Japan. Find out what it took to transition from pastry to savory chef and hear the legendary Michel Richard reflect on his career with Dorothy Cann Hamilton on Chef's Story. This program was sponsored by Heritage Foods USA.

[Savory cooking] is fun because you have to come up with something different every day. You get to create an emotion with your cooking." [15:00]

"In 10 years America will be the best. All the young chefs want to move to America." [27:00]

--Michel Richard on Chef's Story


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