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In this episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio talks kosher wine with Jay Buchsbaum of the Royal Wine Corp. Tune in to hear Linda and Jay define kosher wine, the history of wine in Israel, the caliber and standards for kosher wine and its place among wine connoisseurs. Forget what you know about Manischewitz; these are some high-quality wines! Listen in as Linda samples three of the wines that Royal Wine Corp. distributes. This program was sponsored by Hearst Ranch.

"Wine is an integral part of every part of Jewish life- Friday nights, every celebration, etc. And the only grapes were available were of the Labrusca variety, and they need sugar to make them palatable. So that's when the tradition- in fact, it's a new tradition, only 100 years old- of [sweet] kosher wine started."

--Jay Buchsbaum on A Taste of the Past

"The producers invariably want to be judged by the quality of the wine, not whether or not it's kosher. That's first and foremost."

--Jay Buchsbaum on A Taste of the Past


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On this episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is in the studio with Tim Sullivan, sake educator and founder of the site UrbanSake.com. Tune in to hear about how rice processing and milling determines sake quality, why sake is more similar to beer than wine, and why sake is unlikely to give you a hangover. Did the tsunami affect sake quality and production in Japan? Is the sake contaminated by nuclear material? Tim says that sake production is monitored by the Japanese government and is completely safe! Sake doesn't necessarily need to accompany traditional Japanese food; it suits all types of cuisines and can compliment any meal. Learn more about the history of sake, and try some with your next dinner. This program has been brought to you by Hearst Ranch.

"Sake today can be very elegant. There's a lot of nuance. That's a modern phenomenon. That is something that has only been around for the last forty or fifty years. Sake itself has been around for 2,000 years."

"The more you mill down [the rice], the higher the quality. All the rice we eat is brown; if you're eating white rice, it has been milled."

--Tim Sullivan on A Taste of the Past


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Is milk "nature's perfect food"? This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is joined by cookbook historian Anne Mendelson to debunk this myth. Anne is the author of Milk: The Surprising Story of Milk Through the Ages, a cookbook and overview of milk's history. Learn about milk's volatile chemistry, the differences between different mammals' milks, and Anne's thoughts on the raw milk debate. Also, Anne explains the beginnings of the pasteurization and homogenization processes, and how it changed the lives of urban dwellers in the late 1800s. Hear about modern pasteurization processes, from small to large scale. This program has been brought to you by Cain Winery.

"It [milk] is intended to be supplied in one particularly way, and one alone...under those circumstances it is quite safe to drink, even if it's raw. But if you divert it, if you interrupt that closed system... it changes as soon as you divert it into the outside world; you've already interrupted nature the moment you do that."

"Raw milk's sales allow farmers to sell directly to consumers without a middle man. And it's one of the ways that farmers can sell their product for a price so that they can make a living."

--Anne Mendelson on A Taste of the Past


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