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In the last of the Old School vs New School series, Greg Blais is joined by two talented cheesemongers - Emily Acosta of Eataly and Matt Rubiner of Rubiner's Cheesemongers and Grocers. Hear them both explain how they found cheese as a career, what the world of cheese means to them and what makes a "real" cheesemonger. Find out how the cheese industry has changed over the years and what tools make learning the trade easier in 2014. This program was brought to you by Bonnie Plants.

"We didn't have NYU food studies or cheese caves internships - I made flash cards!" [08:00]

-Matt Rubiner on Cutting the Curd

"I was fascinated by this process of liquid milk turning into something you could keep for a long period of time." [10:00]

--Emily Acosta on Cutting the Curd


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This week on Cutting the Curd, Diane Stemple talks with Gianaclis Caldwell about her new book, The Small-Scale Dairy. Tune into this program to hear how writing this book reminded Gianaclis of the importance of food advocacy. Why is Gianaclis so inspired by the DIY spirit? Learn how some of the FDA's proposed aging regulations could hurt some cheesemakers, and why artisan producers should define their own good manufacturing practices. Hear more about the farmstead cheesemaker short course that Gianaclis hosts, and how she analyzes milk for taste and food safety purposes! This program has been sponsored by White Oak Pastures. Music by The Hollows.

"It's empowering to think, 'If someone else can do something, than I can probably learn to do that thing, too.'" [3:45]

"It's important to be informed... We shouldn't look at food like it's going to be around all of the time; food is not static." [12:40]

"Most of us cheesemakers couldn't afford our own cheese!" [27:15]

-- Gianaclis Caldwell on Cutting the Curd


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Tasteofthepast
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On this episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is in the studio with Tim Sullivan, sake educator and founder of the site UrbanSake.com. Tune in to hear about how rice processing and milling determines sake quality, why sake is more similar to beer than wine, and why sake is unlikely to give you a hangover. Did the tsunami affect sake quality and production in Japan? Is the sake contaminated by nuclear material? Tim says that sake production is monitored by the Japanese government and is completely safe! Sake doesn't necessarily need to accompany traditional Japanese food; it suits all types of cuisines and can compliment any meal. Learn more about the history of sake, and try some with your next dinner. This program has been brought to you by Hearst Ranch.

"Sake today can be very elegant. There's a lot of nuance. That's a modern phenomenon. That is something that has only been around for the last forty or fifty years. Sake itself has been around for 2,000 years."

"The more you mill down [the rice], the higher the quality. All the rice we eat is brown; if you're eating white rice, it has been milled."

--Tim Sullivan on A Taste of the Past


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