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Grains take center stage on this week's episode of A Taste of the Past as host Linda Pelaccio is joined by Bruce Weinstein, cooking instructor and author of "Grain Mains: 101 Surprising and Satisfying Whole Grain Recipes for Every Meal of the Day". Tune in for a lively discussion on grains and their place in culinary history. From quinoa to millet, learn about how whole grains were essential in early China and how they differ from refined grains. From health benefits to culinary applications, Bruce gives listeners plenty to digest on this week's episode of A Taste of the Past. This program was sponsored by White Oak Pastures.

"Millet was the grain of China before rice. Some of the oldest pastas found in China were made of millet flour."

"If you eat whole grain cereal for breakfast you'll be less hungry later than you would if you ate regular sugary cereal."

"Seasonings and flavors have been dumbed down across the board. As a society - we've grown accustomed to more tasteless food that's been over-processed."

"Grains are for everybody - they're not just for the vegans and vegetarians among us!"

--Bruce Weinstein on A Taste of the Past


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On this week's episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is talking about ancient and whole grains with Maria Speck, IACP award winning author of the NYTimes notable book Ancient Grains for Modern Meals. Topics include Maria's upbringing with whole grains, the health benefits of eating grains, and why ancient grains have become fashionable in the food world. Quinoa has been back on the scene for a while, but learn about some lesser known grains such as emmer, kamut- and the most ancient of them all- einkorn. Maria's book includes grain dishes for all of your courses- appetizers, meals, and deserts! Listen to this episode, and you will be an ancient grain expert. This episode is sponsored by Cain Vineyard and Winery.

"The key and my passion is to tell people that whole grains can taste really good."

"In average supermarkets, grain selections are becoming bigger and bigger."

"A big trend in baking is that bakers are looking for local grains and freshly-milled flour."

-- Maria Speck on A Taste of the Past


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This week on A Taste of the Past, Andrew F. Smith once again joins Linda Pelaccio in the studio! Andy teaches food history at the New School in New York City, and is the author and editor of numerous books on culinary history. On this episode, Andy talks about his newest book called Drinking History: Fifteen Turning Points in the Making of American Beverages. Hear about water quality during the Colonial period, and how it led to the proliferation of alcoholic beverages. Why did beer not succeed initially in the New World? Learn about the gendered considerations of specific drinks, like tea and alcohol. Listen in to find out some surprising facts about Prohibition, and how the movement directly related to the outcome of World War I. This program has been sponsored by 360 Cookware.

"Food is even more important than food. You can go for weeks without food, but you need to take in water every couple of days." [5:40]

"People think that we drink a lot of alcohol now, but we don't drink as much as if it were earlier times." [10:30]

"New Yorkers never believe Prohibition was for them. The upper classes drank from the beginning to the end." [29:40]

-- Andrew F. Smith on A Taste of the Past


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