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This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda talks to Nic Mink, professor at the Center for Urban Ecology at Butler University, President and co-founder of Sitka Salmon Shares, and author of Salmon, A Global History. Nic tells us about the various evolutionary mechanisms that salmon have developed to survive. Later, Nic and Linda discuss the developments in catching and storing salmon - from wild to farm-raised, line caught and canned. Tune in to hear the whole discussion! This program has been sponsored by Fairway Market. Today's music provided by The Hollows.

"Salmon was kind of nature's first convenience food." [10:40]

"If you ever see on a menu 'Wild Atlantic Salmon', that restaurant is either doing something incredibly bad, or they are mislabeling their menu." [24:45]

"The best thing to do for a wild salmon actually is to eat one!" [34:05]

Nic Mink on A Taste of the Past


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Master the art of Southern cooking today on A Taste of the Past! This week, Linda Pelaccio is joined in the studio by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart, co-authors of the book Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking. Both Nathalie and Cynthia have had storied careers in the food world. How has the landscape changed for women in the kitchen? Hear Nathalie and Cynthia talk about the defining ingredients and flavors of Southern food, and the importance of eating real food. How do the foods in different regions of the South fit together into a concise cuisine? Learn more about the cooking techniques, recipe testing, and creativity that went into Nathalie and Cynthia's book! This program has been brought to you by White Oak Pastures.

"That's what I call 'the new Southern cooking movement' - when you take the fresh ingredients around you and use them in a classic way, or you use new vegetables in classic ways." [9:40] -- Nathalie Dupree on A Taste of the Past

"If you eat real food in modest portions, you're going to be so satisfied. It's when we restrict ourselves, go on crazy diets- that's when we get unsatisfied; you can't really satisfy that hunger." [15:00] -- Cynthia Graubart on A Taste of the Past


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This week's episode of A Taste of the Past is a dedication to Craig Claiborne, legendary New York Times restaurant critic. Linda Pelaccio is talking with Tom McNamee, author of the recent Craig Claiborne-focused book, The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat. When Craig Claiborne began his career, there was no outlet for critical review of restaurant and food culture. Tune in to hear about how Craig Claiborne transformed The New York Times' food coverage into the critical lens that it is known to be today. Hear about how he brought the star rating system for restaurants to the United States, and how he introduced American households to multitudes of ethnic cuisines. If you think some restaurants are extravagantly priced, listen in to hear about a meal that Mr. Claiborne shared with chef Pierre Franey that cost roughly $20,000 in today's currency. Hear more about the fascinating life and work of Craig Claiborne in this week's episode of A Taste of the Past! This episode was sponsored by White Oak Pastures

"I think it's important to realize what the American context was at the time. It was just shortly after World War II, and industrialized food was in a huge upsurge... it was an absolute wasteland in American food!"

"He was bringing strange things to The New York Times' readership immediately in his first column."

"He kept constantly bringing in the 'outer world', and therefore a lot of things that we take for granted [he introduced in our culture]."

-- Tom McNamee on A Taste of the Past


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