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Nicholas Freudenberg is Distinguished Professor of Public Health at CUNY’s School of Public Health at Hunter College. He is also co-director of the New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College. He has written or edited five books and more than 75 scientific articles on urban health policy, HIV prevention, community mobilization for health and the role of food policy in health. Recently, Nicholas wrote Lethal but Legal, a book outlining the 'corporate consumption complex'. Tune into this week's edition of What Doesn't Kill You to hear Nicholas uncover the roots of corporate dominance, the problems with current tax laws, and externalization. Why should government be the only type of organization to monitor industry? How can a society overturn the 'corporate consumption complex' and expose the problems of globalization? Find out all of this and more on this week's episode of What Doesn't Kill You! Thanks to our sponsor, S. Wallace Edwards & Sons.

"Companies propose voluntary guidelines that are much looser than what public health professionals suggest, and then they don't even follow those guidelines!" [14:35]

"Today many regulatory agencies lack the resources, but only government- as an independent voice- can monitor these industries." [16:00]

-- Nicholas Freudenberg on What Doesn't Kill You


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First Aired - 04/05/2009 09:00AM Download MP3 (Full Episode)
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This week's Q Report is about beginnings: the roots of the mind, new connectivity in rural America, and reclaiming pre-industrial food systems.

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What's more American than apple pie? Answer: apple cider! On this week's episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is talking with "apple evangelist" and author of Cider, Hard and Sweet, Ben Watson. Where did the tradition of American cider originate? Hear about how grafting has caused the amount of apple varieties to diminish, and learn about the role of the Industrial Revolution in cider's popularity. Find out how cider stacks up against beer and wine in terms of alcohol content, and learn what varieties of apples make the best cider. Also, learn what differentiates hard cider from apple jack. Also, Sara Grady calls in from Glynwood to talk about their new initiative, The Apple Project. Learn about the importance of hard cider and apple spirits to the regional economy! This program has been brought to you by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"Almost any apple makes decent cider because when you press it, you get different qualities. Is it sour? It's going to have bitterness and astringency to it that adds body- just like wine."

"Apples provided another way to create a beverage that was plentiful and easy to produce."

-- Ben Watson on A Taste of the Past


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