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What-doesn_t-kill-you
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Nicholas Freudenberg is Distinguished Professor of Public Health at CUNY’s School of Public Health at Hunter College. He is also co-director of the New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College. He has written or edited five books and more than 75 scientific articles on urban health policy, HIV prevention, community mobilization for health and the role of food policy in health. Recently, Nicholas wrote Lethal but Legal, a book outlining the 'corporate consumption complex'. Tune into this week's edition of What Doesn't Kill You to hear Nicholas uncover the roots of corporate dominance, the problems with current tax laws, and externalization. Why should government be the only type of organization to monitor industry? How can a society overturn the 'corporate consumption complex' and expose the problems of globalization? Find out all of this and more on this week's episode of What Doesn't Kill You! Thanks to our sponsor, S. Wallace Edwards & Sons.

"Companies propose voluntary guidelines that are much looser than what public health professionals suggest, and then they don't even follow those guidelines!" [14:35]

"Today many regulatory agencies lack the resources, but only government- as an independent voice- can monitor these industries." [16:00]

-- Nicholas Freudenberg on What Doesn't Kill You


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The-farm-report
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How is farming tied to carbon and how does carbon keep life on earth possible? Find out on a very elemental and scientific episode of The Farm Report as host Erin Fairbanks is joined by Courtney White, the author of Grass, Soil, Hope. A former archaeologist and Sierra Club activist, White dropped out of the 'conflict industry' in 1997 to co-found the Quivira Coalition, a nonprofit dedicated to building bridges between ranchers, conservationists, public land managers, scientists, and others around the idea of land health. On today's show, Courtney explains what makes carbon such an essential part of the soil (and the earth) and introduces some alternative methods of farming that could help bring more carbon into our soil. The answer is biological farming - not chemical farming, and Courtney makes a clear case for out of the box thinking when it comes to our land and soil. Tune in and learn about the real issues in the ground and on the minds of sustainable agricultural thinkers everywhere. This program was brought to you by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"How carbon gets cycled is extremely important to maintaining life on this planet!" [02:45]

"We want biological farming not chemical farming." [05:16]

"If we want to store more carbon we have to stop killing the fungi in the soil." [07:36]

"If you have a practice that increases plant vigor and makes plants happy, you're storing more carbon in the soil." [12:40]

"Changes start in the margin, ideas start on the outside and move in over time...but how do you get them to speed up that journey to the center? That's tough. We need policy changes and we have such a dysfunctional political system right now" [20:42]

--Courtney White on The Farm Report


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First Aired - 04/05/2009 09:00AM Download MP3 (Full Episode)
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Patright
Sponsored by
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This week's Q Report is about beginnings: the roots of the mind, new connectivity in rural America, and reclaiming pre-industrial food systems.

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