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On today’s THE FOOD SEEN, meet culinary producer Libbie Summers. She lives a food-inspired life, so much so that she’s branded her business that way. Her grandmother thought Betty Crocker was a bore, so Libbie sought to change that. Her newest book, “Sweet & Vicious: Baking with Attitude”, sets a scene for each sweet to be served in. From her Good & Plenty Cupcakes’ pink anise frosting to a Fairground Attraction Cake with over a foot of cotton candy atop, over the top is exactly what these desserts are about! Watch her cookbook trailer and you’ll see. You can also follow Libbie’s musing with photographer Chia Chong on their collaborative/creative blog, Salted and Styled. This program was brought to you by Edwards VA Ham.

"I hate when midwestern and southern cooking gets a bad wrap for being fried or whatever - it's really clean flavors most of the time." [07:00]

--Libbie Summers on The Food Seen


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African, Caribbean, and southern food are all known and loved as vibrant and flavor-packed cuisines. In Afro-Vegan: Farm-Fresh African, Caribbean, and Southern Flavors Remixed, renowned chef and food justice activist Bryant Terry reworks and remixes the favorite staples, ingredients, and classic dishes of the African Diaspora to present wholly new, creative culinary combinations that will amaze vegans, vegetarians, and omnivores alike. Hear from Bryant on this week's episode of Eat Your Words as host Briana Kurtz chats with Bryant about his own vegan journey, his approach to writing books and his inspirations in the kitchen. This program was brought to you by Edwards VA Ham.

"If you consider the different groups that have made up Louisiana - the French, Spanish, Africans, Native Americans [...] it truly is a hybrid cuisine that I inspire to create in my own cookbook writing." [06:00]

--Bryant Terry on Eat Your Words


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This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio delving into the history of soy sauce with Helen Roberts, the Publicity Manager and Creative Culinary Director at Kikkoman USA. Soy sauce has a rich history, dating back to 500 B.C. in China! Learn about the brewing processes that are used to make soy sauce! Tune in to learn about the Japanese standards for soy sauce, and why many soy sauces in the United States would not pass as authentic in Japan. Helen also shares some alternative uses for soy sauce; learn how to brine your turkey and make chocolate with soy sauce! Hear about the rich family history of the company, and its horizontal operating ideology. Check out the Kikkoman USA documentary trailer on their website. "Make haste slowly" - it's the Kikkoman way! This episode has been brought to you by S. Wallace Edwards & Sons.

"People haven't learned how to use soy sauce properly. A lot of times, it seems too salty because they have used way too much. You should use soy sauce as an umami ingredient to increase the flavors of everything else." [10:30]

-- Helen Roberts on A Taste of the Past


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