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This week on The Morning After, Host Jessie Kiefer welcomes back Co-Host Sari Kamin after her European excursion! Erin Sylvester also joins the program for a special ode to a beloved restaurant. In the first half of the show, the duo bring on Katrina Moore, director of the documentary, Under the Mango Tree: Food, Health, and Love in Ghana. What started out as a school trip to Ghana, Katrina became inspired by a Ghanian doctor, Dr. Abdulai, struggling to care for his community against all odds. She then decided to turn the experience into a meaningful way to fulfill her Master's thesis in New York University's Food Studies program. After creating an IndieGogo account to raise necessary funds, the project has started to garner support from around the world. Check out the link here to contribute. Later, Sari shares all about her adventures eating around Europe! Tune in for a packed show. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

"The doctor [Dr. Abdulai] saw that the homeless tended to behave very wildly in the streets. They would steal food from the women in the markets...they would be very violent...so the doctor would see that and named it as hunger because he knew hunger. He grew up hungry on the streets of Tamale himself." [18:06]

"The title Under the Mango Tree comes from the doctor's first surgery at the clinic location... The first surgery performed before there were any buildings was performed under this huge mango tree that now provides food and shade and beauty to the clinic grounds." [22:31]

-- Katrina Moore on The Morning After


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50 years ago, 1964 The Civil Rights Act was passed. Nicole Taylor, who hosted 162 episodes of Hot Grease from 2009-2013 on Heritage Radio Network, is producing a documentary remembering how the civil rights movement played out in Athens, GA specifically through the story of the Varsity protests.

By Jack Inslee

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This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio delving into the history of soy sauce with Helen Roberts, the Publicity Manager and Creative Culinary Director at Kikkoman USA. Soy sauce has a rich history, dating back to 500 B.C. in China! Learn about the brewing processes that are used to make soy sauce! Tune in to learn about the Japanese standards for soy sauce, and why many soy sauces in the United States would not pass as authentic in Japan. Helen also shares some alternative uses for soy sauce; learn how to brine your turkey and make chocolate with soy sauce! Hear about the rich family history of the company, and its horizontal operating ideology. Check out the Kikkoman USA documentary trailer on their website. "Make haste slowly" - it's the Kikkoman way! This episode has been brought to you by S. Wallace Edwards & Sons.

"People haven't learned how to use soy sauce properly. A lot of times, it seems too salty because they have used way too much. You should use soy sauce as an umami ingredient to increase the flavors of everything else." [10:30]

-- Helen Roberts on A Taste of the Past


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