S H O W  S C H E D U L E
SUNDAY
12:OO - 12:45 /// The Main Course
1:OO-1:3O /// Eat Your Words
2:OO-2:3O /// Arts & Seizures
3:OO-4:OO /// The Morning After
4:3O-5:3O /// Snacky Tunes
6:OO-6:3O /// Joshua David Stein Variety Hour...Half Hour
MONDAY
1O:OO-1O:3O /// Wild Game Domain
11:OO-11:3O /// Inside School Food
12:OO-12:3O /// What Doesn't Kill You
1:OO-1:3O /// Radio Cherry Bombe
3:OO-3:4O /// We Dig Plants
5:OO-5:3O /// Cutting the Curd
6:OO-6:3O /// Animal Instinct
7:OO-7:3O /// Fuhmentaboudit!
8:OO-8:3O /// Eating Disorder
TUESDAY
12:OO-12:45 /// Cooking Issues
1:OO-1:3O /// Let's Get Real
2:OO-2:3O /// Sharp & Hot
3:OO-3:3O /// The Food Seen
4:OO-4:3O /// Greenhorns Radio
5:OO-5:45 /// Beer Sessions Radio (TM)
7:OO-7:3O /// Roberta's Radio
WEDNESDAY
1O:OO - 1O:3O /// In the Drink
11:OO-11:3O /// Taste Matters
12:OO-12:45 /// Chef's Story
1:OO - 1:3O /// After the Jump
2:OO-2:45/// WORD OF MOUTH
3:OO-3:3O /// The Speakeasy
4:OO-4:45 /// All in the Industry
5:OO-5:3O /// the business of The Business
THURSDAY
11:OO - 11:3O /// Native
12:OO - 12:3O /// A Taste of the Past
1:OO - 1:3O /// The Farm Report
2:OO-2:3O /// Pizza Party
3:OO-3:3O /// Eating Matters
4:OO - 5:OO /// Food Talk with Mike Colameco
6:OO-6:45 /// Mama Coco's Funky Kitchen
7:3O-8:3O /// Full Service Radio
9:OO-1O:3O /// GUNWASH
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Evolutionaries
My Welcome Table
How Great Cities Are Fed
PUNCH Radio
The Whole Shebang
Edible Alphabet
PAST PROGRAMS
No Chefs Allowed
Anastasia's Fridge
It's More Than Food
Straight from the Source
Metropolitan Ave
Summer of Food
HRN on Sandy
Micology
Everything's On the Table
Hot Grease
U Look Hungry
The Naturalist
Burning Down the House
Search Results
Hosted By
The-food-seen-new
Sponsored by
Considerbardwell_300x300_72dpi
On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, we welcome jill-of-all-trades, Gail Simmons. Special Projects Director at Food & Wine Magazine, judge on Top Chef and Top Chef Duels (Bravo, WED 10PM EST), as well as host of FYI’s The Feed (FYI, THURS, 10PM EST), Gail may be best know for organizing events and overseeing competitions, but she also knows the challenges of one-upmanship. Gail’s modesty precedes her, having toiled as a food writer in Toronto, cooked in cutthroat NYC kitchens like Le Cirque 2000, worked with famed restaurateur Daniel Boulud, and assisted in the offices of Vogue’s own Jeffery Steingarten. Her book, "Talking with My Mouth Full: My Life as a Professional Eater", may chronicle her life until now, but how does Gail continue to keep separate her true self from her on-camera personality. Or does she? Today's program was brought to you by Consider Bardwell.

Photo by Melanie Dunea

"I was the only woman in both kitchens I cooked in. They were tough places. When all the guys would leave at the end of the night and go drinking and getting into trouble, I would generally go home and read books." [30:00]

"I'm not really a food critic, I just play one on TV!" [39:00]

"Being on television, my greatest reward is when somebody comes up to me and says 'Because I watch your show with my son he now loves to cook and wants to be a chef.' " [54:00]

--Gail Simmons on THE FOOD SEEN


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

Hosted By
Cb_sqlogo_1_
Sponsored by
Bsc_logo
This week's guests: Dorie Greenspan & Christine Muhlke

Over the past 20 years, Dorie Greenspan has written 10 cookbooks and won six James Beard and IACP awards for them, including Cookbook of the Year ... twice! She won the IACP Cookbook-of-the-Year Award for Desserts by Pierre Herme and for The New York Times Bestseller, Around My French Table. She's also been named to the James Beard Foundation's Who's Who of Food and Beverage in America. Dorie's latest book is Baking Chez Moi, Recipes From My Paris Kitchen to Your Kitchen Anywhere. Baking Chez Moi is filled with recipes for the simple, homey, wonderfully delicious sweets that she and her friends bake at home in Paris.

"Living in France has really meant that I can work in France. "I have the access to people who can share recipes with me." [05:00]

"There are more women doing spectacular jobs that I didn't think would be possible at the time I was being turned away." [39:00]

-- Dorie Greenspan on Radio Cherry Bombe

Bon Appetit Executive editor Christine Muhlke is the co-author of "Manresa: An Edible Reflection" with David Kinch and "On the Line: Inside the World of Le Bernardin" with Eric Ripert. She was formerly the food editor at the New York Times Magazine.

"One of the great things about being a writer is it gives you license to be nosy." [12:00]

--Christine Muhlke on Radio Cherry Bombe


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

Hosted By
Eat-your-words
Sponsored by
Edw116_150x150_042910sm
This week on Eat Your Words, host Talia Ralph gets into the meat and grits of Southern food with Francis Lam, Top Chef judge, food writer, and the editor of Cornbread Nation 7, an anthology of the best southern food writing in recent years. From its hazy geographic boundaries to the wealth and layering of cultures and tastes, the Southern United States is more than just a spot on the map. Lam -- himself a self-described honorary Southerner, hailing from New Jersey -- addresses some tough questions about the Dixie and its foodways. He also shares his own misguided preconceptions and stories about Southern hospitality. Is Virginia the south? Is Miami, Florida? Are you still Southern if you've lived in New York for the last 10 years? Yes, yes and yes, according to this expansive collection of writing. Curious? Craving some good quality barbecue talk? Tune in to this episode for more! This program was brought to you Edwards VA Ham.

"The idea of what it means to be Southern is in a lot of ways is the idea of what it means to be American - rightly or wrongly!" [05:00]

"I've intellectually come to realize you can't just broadly paint stereotypes of people and be comfortable with them. If you told me who I thought I would meet in Mississippi when I was 16, I'd be so embarrassed with what my 16 year self would say." [12:00]

"I think Southern food has become the national regional cuisine. We like the idea that it's a regional cuisine because it makes it seem more real. The fact that the South is perceived as being tradition minded feeds into that idea." [29:00]

--Francis Lam on Eat Your Words


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER

PARTNERS
FEATURED EVENTS