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Eating
Sponsored by
Fairway
This week on Eating Disorder, the Rev. Spyro, Chef Paul, and Crazy Legs Conti take on the topic of foraging for food. To start, the guys bring on Lee Allen Peterson, expert on edible wild plants, to corroborate and quell their thoughts on the more traditional survival technique. Lee cautions the crew on nature's warning signs concerning wild foods as well as ways to successfully eat wild. In the second half of the show, Wildman Steve Brill and daughter Violet hit home the concept of urban foraging. Telling the infamous tale of being arrested for eating wild dandelions in Central Park, Steve still leads regular tours through the park, spreading the word on the urban foraging lifestyle. Tune in to hear all about living off the land - wild or urban! This program was brought to you by Fairway Market.

"Things are out in the wild are usually more clean and more germ free than things you're going to get in the markets." [12:32]

--Lee Allen Peterson on Eating Disorder

"I've been doing this for 32 years - I just had close to 80 people in Central Park, no one has ever gotten sick. The stuff is makes you healthy. It's what you buy in the fast food places that makes you sick." [31:11]

--Wildman Steve Brill on Eating Disorder


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Hosted By
Chef_s-story
This week's featured guest on Chef's Story Katy Sparks, Executive Chef at Tavern on the Green. Dorothy Cann Hamilton is in Central Park this week as she chats with Katy, who's background includes cooking at NYC institutions like The Quilted Giraffe and Mesa Grill. Find out what it's like cooking at a restaurant that seats 700(!!) and comes with a storied reputation that rivals any other dining establishment in the country. From an early appreciation of food to her climb up kitchen ladders - find out how this Middlebury born culinary talent rose to the top in a candid and insightful look at her career. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market

"I was actually a hostess at a bar and little by little I just kept gravitating towards the kitchen because of memories of being in my mom's kitchen - the center of the house." [05:00]

"I learned that you don't have to be a food service to run a restaurant." [17:00]

"The first decision you make is important - but not fatal by any means." [22:00]

"My cooking is very personal. I'm not trying to cater to people's needs." [33:00]

--Katy Sparks on Chef's Story


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Hosted By
Tasteofthepast
Sponsored by
Cain-logotype-hrn-150
Hooked on Downton Abbey? Curious what food was like during the Edwardian Period? Tune in to an especially historic episode of A Taste of the Past with Linda Pelaccio as she is joined by Cathy Kaufman, chair of the Culinary Historians of New York. Find out why English food has a rich tradition and why it gets such a bad reputation these days. Learn about early haute cuisine, table settings, cookbooks and the important of the dining room as it relates to the period of time featured on Downton Abbey. This program is sponsored by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"English food at that time [The Edwardian Era] had fabulous butter, cream and meats. The houses all had wonderful gardens. There was no reason for the food not to be good. English food gets its bad reputation because of the true hardships with food rationing that the population underwent after World War I, The Great Depression and World War II."

"In England unlike in the US, while you would have some flowers and silver candelabra, it would not be overly profuse. I think there's an interesting juxtaposition between American and English tables at this time. The American table is rather gaudy by comparison."

--Cathy Kaufman, Chair of the Culinary Historians of New York on A Taste of The Past


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