Search Results
Hosted By
Business
Sponsored by
Wfm
Published August 14th, 2014

Running time: 11 Minutes

We mill grain with Bruce Stewart in True Grain Bread in Cowichan Bay, Vancouver Island, Canada. Bruce explains how ancient and heirloom grains provide a solution to those with gluten sensitivities. It’s not gluten that’s the problem – it’s modern wheat gluten. For more information, check out these pieces on the Rise of the Northeast Grains, as well as the Maine Grains Alliance.

By Laura del Campo


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

Hosted By
The-farm-report
Sponsored by
Wfm
Get ready to learn a whole lot about grains on a special episode of The Farm Report. Erin Fairbanks is joined by Amber Lambke, Executive Director of the Maine Grains Alliance and host of the annual KNEADING Conference. Amber knows her grains and talks about everything from infrastructure to economics. The Maine Grains Alliance's mission is to preserve and promote grain traditions, from earth to hearth. They provide opportunities to learn and share how best to grow and use grains, using a combination of traditional, innovative, and sustainable techniques. The KNEADING conference brings together farmers, professional and home bakers, chefs, cooks, grain researchers, maltsters, food entrepreneurs, and wood-fired oven enthusiasts to educate one another about the art and science of growing and milling grains and baking artisan breads. Over the next 5-10 years the landscape of grains will change dramatically. Find out why on The Farm Report. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

"What we're finding is that grains make a lot of sense in a diversified crop rotation. Many farmers starting to sell us grains also sell other things." [7:13]

"We lost grain production to an economy of scale that made it cheaper to grow high yielding varieties of grain in the midwest." [9:19]

"In the US right now the percentage of organic grain production happening is still less than 1% of the grain production in our country. We have an opportunity in New England to stay focused on organic and non-GMO grain production." [12:17]

"Over the next 5-10 years the landscape of grains will change dramatically. We're not just buying white flour, we're paying a lot more attention to what we're buying." [24:53]

--Amber Lambke on The Farm Report


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

Hosted By
Tasteofthepast
Sponsored by
Untitled
Grains take center stage on this week's episode of A Taste of the Past as host Linda Pelaccio is joined by Bruce Weinstein, cooking instructor and author of "Grain Mains: 101 Surprising and Satisfying Whole Grain Recipes for Every Meal of the Day". Tune in for a lively discussion on grains and their place in culinary history. From quinoa to millet, learn about how whole grains were essential in early China and how they differ from refined grains. From health benefits to culinary applications, Bruce gives listeners plenty to digest on this week's episode of A Taste of the Past. This program was sponsored by White Oak Pastures.

"Millet was the grain of China before rice. Some of the oldest pastas found in China were made of millet flour."

"If you eat whole grain cereal for breakfast you'll be less hungry later than you would if you ate regular sugary cereal."

"Seasonings and flavors have been dumbed down across the board. As a society - we've grown accustomed to more tasteless food that's been over-processed."

"Grains are for everybody - they're not just for the vegans and vegetarians among us!"

--Bruce Weinstein on A Taste of the Past


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER

PARTNERS
FEATURED EVENTS