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Imagine having to cook Thanksgiving dinner over an open fire! This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is joined in the studio by historical interpreter Carolina Capehart. Carolina is a hearth-cooking expert, and prefers to cook all types of food over an open flame. Tune into this episode to learn what tools were used in the 1800s to boil vegetables, roast meat, and bake breads. Hear why Carolina is so dedicated to historical accuracy. Carolina explains how the colonialists pioneered local and seasonal eating- out of necessity! Learn about the founding ideals of the United States as an agrarian society. How does the language of the 1800s confuse the recreation of historic recipes? Collect some firewood and slaughter a hog; it's time for this week's episode of A Taste of the Past! This program has been brought to you by White Oak Pastures. Music by Pamela Royal.

"Anything you can cook these days, you can cook oven an open fire. It's just about learning a different system." [3:45]

"These days, everyone says that you need to eat seasonally and locally. Back in the 1800s, they did that, but mainly because they had to!" [20:20]

"90% of people back then were farmers. That was Jefferson's ideal- an agricultural society." [23:10]

-- Carolina Capehart on A Taste of the Past


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How did restaurants become such a staple in American culture? Tune in for a lively discussion with historian and professor Cindy Lobel on this week's episode of A Taste of the Past. Linda and Cindy chat about the history of restaurants in New York, and explain how our foodways were urbanized and colonial taverns evolved into the modern day restaurant. From Delmonico's to boarding houses, learn more about the emergence of the restaurant and our gastronomic growth. This episode was sponsored by Fairway Market

"The growth of restaurants in New York is directly related to the growth of New York."

--Historian Cindy Lobel on A Taste of the Past


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Linda Pelaccio begins today's episode of A Taste of the Past by taking a moment to spread the word about Family-to-Family, a relief organization that allows a group of people to sponsor a family who has been affected by Hurricane Sandy. Thanksgiving has always been accompanied by charitable spirit; check out Family-to-Family, and get involved with the hurricane relief efforts. Today, Linda is speaking with food historian Sandy Oliver about the roots of Thanksgiving! Sandy is also the author of the book Saltwater Foodways, a history of Yankee cooking and New England eating traditions, and the recent Maine Home Cooking. Tune into this episode to learn about the religious considerations of Thanksgiving, and how it came to be a national holiday. What foods were most likely on the table during the first harvest feast? Sandy and Linda share some dishes that you may not recognize! Hear about the history of Thanksgiving commercialism! This program has been sponsored by Rolling Press.

"Most of us don't recognize mincemeat for the preserve that it is. It is a way of preserving meat along with apples and other kinds of fruits. It also was convenience food." [14:05]

-- Sandy Oliver on A Taste of the Past


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