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Nathan Myhrvold is the former Chief Technology Officer at Microsoft, and co-founder of Intellectual Ventures. He tells us about his profound interest in cooking, and his difficult introduction into the world of becoming a chef. Nathan discusses the modernization of French cuisine, as well as the differences between modern cuisine and traditional fine dining. Then, he describes the development of his endeavors in writing Modernist Cuisine, and how digital photography proved to be an essential part of creating the ideal reading and learning environment for the reader. Finally, Nathan tells us about a few 'radical' ideas for improving wine that would absolutely shock most wine connoisseurs. This program has been sponsored by Hearst Ranch.

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"Technologoy has consequences, some of them bad consequences, but so far we've been able to figure them out." [20:00]

--Nathan Myhrvold on Evolutionaries


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First Aired - 08/25/2013 04:00PM Download MP3 (Full Episode)
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EGGPLANT BRUSCETTA TOPPER

  • 2lbs classic Black King Italian eggplant, peeled to leave 1” stripes and cut into 1” thick cubes
  • Cheap olive oil or vegetable oil
  • 1 cubanelle pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1 small Spanish onion, sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 4 sprigs thyme, destemmed
  • 1/8 cup red wine vinegar
  • ¼ cup golden raisins
  • 1/8 cup pine nuts
  • Salt, sugar (or honey) and pepper, to taste
  • 1 good, crusty baguette, sliced, brushed with olive oil and toasted
  • Line a large rimmed baking sheet with paper towels. Arrange the eggplant slices in a single layer on the paper towels and sprinkle them with salt. Let stand for 1 hour. Pat the eggplant dry with paper towels. Rinse and dry thoroughly.

    In a large, heavy bottomed pan, heat the oil over medium high. If you don’t have a thermometer, you can test the heat of the oil by dropping slices of onion in – when it’s ready, tiny bubbles will form around the edges. Once it’s good and hot, add the eggplant in batches if necessary and fry for about 3-4 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the eggplant to fresh paper towels to drain.

    Pour all but about a tablespoon of the oil off of the pan you used for frying (using an empty coffee can is good for this) and replace the pot over heat. Add the thyme, peppers, onion and garlic to the skillet and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until they begin to lose their shape, about 6-8 minutes, seasoning with salt and pepper, sugar or honey to taste along the way, until everything coalesces into a nice, thick sauce. Return the eggplant to the skillet, stir gently to coat and cook for 3 minutes, or until combined. Stir in the red wine vinegar and simmer for 1 minute. Remove from the heat. Taste for seasoning, adding salt or vinegar as needed. Let cool to room temperature, or refrigerate until lightly chilled, about 20 minutes, then stir in your golden raisins and pine nuts before serving atop crostini toasts.

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    If you're old enough, you remember the days when "cafeteria ladies" had a craft and the food at school was hand made, right down to the dinner rolls. After decades of moving away from that proud tradition, districts are slowly returning to it. In Maryland, a stand-out "boot camp" for food service workers statewide teaches basic cookery, nutrition science, professional kitchen protocols, and much more. It's a model for training programs that are emerging all over the nation as schools work their way forward (and back) to more real, fresh food in the cafeteria. This program was brought to you by White Oak Pastures.

    "The folks that attend our training are trained on how to train and then there's a ripple effect." [05:30]

    --Stewart Eidel on Inside School Food

    "We're trying to be catalysts for the local economy and jump-start it through economic development. which is just a sidebar to all this [school food initiative]" [35:00]

    --Jeffrey Proulx on Inside School Food

    "Anybody can heat anything up regardless of technique - but to actually have to chop vegetables or whatever the recipe calls for - gives me more pride." [36:00]

    --Becky Anderson on Inside School Food


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