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This week on Snacky Tunes Greg and Darin welcome Steve Rogenstein, Founder of theARTcorps and Co-Producer of the NYC Honey Week. Right off the bat, the guys talk to Steve (a native New Yorker) about the yesteryear of NYC, and delve into his background and how he founded theARTcorps in 2003. Steve recently turned his attention to the NYC Honey Week, a citywide festival celebrating the honeybee. Honey Week 2014 merges the educational, the entertaining, and the delicious. From beekeeping workshops to honey-themed dinners, apiary tours, honey tastings, and honey-infused drink specials, the festival flits from neighborhood to neighborhood in NYC. Check it out from September 8-14 throughout the city. In the second half of the show, the guys welcome the band Motion Studies in for maybe one of the biggest live setups in Snacky Tunes history. Talking to the seven-piece band about their background and general band life, tune in for some great live music from Motion Studies! This program was brought to you by Rolling Press.


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This week on The Farm Report, Erin ushers in blueberry season! She welcomes Ed Flanagan, CEO of Wyman's of Maine to the program. Wyman's of Maine is a family owned company that specializes in the growing and marketing of wild blueberries. At the top of the show, Ed explains that Wyman's of Maine believes in the Japanese philosophy known as "kaizen," roughly translated as continuous improvement. Simply put: Wyman's has to do all they can to grow their business. Erin and Ed then delve in to discuss the details of the blueberry business, beginning with the distinctions between the wild and cultivated blueberry, Wyman's approach to the growing season, as well as the topic of honey bees and how vital they are to the business. With concerns such as colony collapse disorder, a strange phenomenon where worker bees abruptly disappear, Ed explains how Wyman's had to research, adapt and become invested in bee-keeping to further sustain their livelihood. Grab a smoothie and tune in for a great discussion on the super fruit! This program was sponsored by Fairway Market.

"A wild blueberry is much smaller, about three times smaller, than a cultivated blueberry. Generally, the flavor of a fruit is condensed around the skin, so in a handful of wild blueberries you're going to get more flavor." [7:14]

"We aspire to get to that point someday where we absolutely need no preventative chemicals." [12:50]

"What happened for us that was pretty good luck was right about the time that blueberries were being regarded as a healthy food was just about the same time that people started drinking smoothies." [19:45]

"We are out of business if there are no honey bees to put in our fields." [26:26]

--Ed Flanagan on The Farm Report


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Tasteofthepast
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This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is joined by food writer and journalist Toni Tipton-Martin for a discussion on imagery, stereotypes and African American cuisine and culture as it relates to the famous and controversial image of Aunt Jemima. Learn more about the history behind the trademarked character and hear what Toni thinks "soul food" actually means in the context of African American cooking. This program was sponsored by Fairway Market.

"There is quite a bit of debate now over whether the woman being depicted as Aunt Jemima ever existed at all."

"I think there's an expectation as an African American cook or chef to conform to an image that has been constructed in the trademark of Aunt Jemima."

"Soul Food is a definition that emerged out of the Civil Rights struggles of the 1960's, at a time when African American dance, music and other artistic expressions were being reclaimed and identified by the term 'soul'. For that particular period of time, [soul food] is a suitable definition for what was coming out of the kitchen."

"I'm hoping we can look at these women free of gender and racial biases and just look at the work they did at the time."

--Journalist and Author Toni Tipton-Martin on A Taste of the Past


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