Search Results
Hosted By
What-doesn_t-kill-you
Sponsored by
Edw116_150x150_042910sm
Nicholas Freudenberg is Distinguished Professor of Public Health at CUNY’s School of Public Health at Hunter College. He is also co-director of the New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College. He has written or edited five books and more than 75 scientific articles on urban health policy, HIV prevention, community mobilization for health and the role of food policy in health. Recently, Nicholas wrote Lethal but Legal, a book outlining the 'corporate consumption complex'. Tune into this week's edition of What Doesn't Kill You to hear Nicholas uncover the roots of corporate dominance, the problems with current tax laws, and externalization. Why should government be the only type of organization to monitor industry? How can a society overturn the 'corporate consumption complex' and expose the problems of globalization? Find out all of this and more on this week's episode of What Doesn't Kill You! Thanks to our sponsor, S. Wallace Edwards & Sons.

"Companies propose voluntary guidelines that are much looser than what public health professionals suggest, and then they don't even follow those guidelines!" [14:35]

"Today many regulatory agencies lack the resources, but only government- as an independent voice- can monitor these industries." [16:00]

-- Nicholas Freudenberg on What Doesn't Kill You


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

Hosted By
Tasteofthepast
Sponsored by
360
This week on A Taste of the Past, Andrew F. Smith once again joins Linda Pelaccio in the studio! Andy teaches food history at the New School in New York City, and is the author and editor of numerous books on culinary history. On this episode, Andy talks about his newest book called Drinking History: Fifteen Turning Points in the Making of American Beverages. Hear about water quality during the Colonial period, and how it led to the proliferation of alcoholic beverages. Why did beer not succeed initially in the New World? Learn about the gendered considerations of specific drinks, like tea and alcohol. Listen in to find out some surprising facts about Prohibition, and how the movement directly related to the outcome of World War I. This program has been sponsored by 360 Cookware.

"Food is even more important than food. You can go for weeks without food, but you need to take in water every couple of days." [5:40]

"People think that we drink a lot of alcohol now, but we don't drink as much as if it were earlier times." [10:30]

"New Yorkers never believe Prohibition was for them. The upper classes drank from the beginning to the end." [29:40]

-- Andrew F. Smith on A Taste of the Past


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER

PARTNERS
FEATURED EVENTS