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On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, we raise a glass with Hannah Hart of My Drunk Kitchen on YouTube. In a mere few years, Hannah’s YouTube channel has over 1.3 million subscribers, who patiently wait for Thursdays, when a new video is released, full of adult beverages, pro-am cooking, and childish shenanigans. A fateful night of cat sitting, a bottle of red wine, and an attempt to make grilled cheese, all caught on camera, lead to Hannah’s internet celebrity fame. Her unlikely odyssey is now highlighted in My Drunk Kitchen: The Cookbook. Learn how to make The Hartwich, a Can Bake, Latke Shotkes, PB&J&PC, Scotch Eggs, Tiny Sandwiches, Saltine Nachos, Pizza Cake, Uncurrygement Curry … and of course, drink while you’re doing it. This program was brought to you by Michter's.

"Entertainment never seemed like a viable option - it seemed so impractical! ... YouTube, blessedly, was that open door." [14:00]

"What's so awesome about YouTube is you can make videos for your friends still and it doesn't have to be for the goal of gaining a million subscribers. I hope people don't lose sight of that." [16:00]

"If I didn't think there was a healthy separation from the me in my body and the me I was in front of somebody else, I would be a crazy person. Of course its a little played up." [24:00]

--Hannah Hart on The Food Seen


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What foods were historical figures like Emily Dickinson, Benjamin Franklin, and Leonardo Da Vinci eating during their lifetimes? On this week's episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio chats with Tori Avey- author and food writer- and the editor and curator of TheHistoryKitchen.com! Tori, who also serves as the chair for the IACP Food History Section, became interested in history through her grandparents, and was always fascinated by the kitchen. Hear how Tori combined her two loves by researching Jewish cuisine, and how that research fueled TheHistoryKitchen.com. Later, hear Linda and Tori talk about the importance of referencing primary sources in culinary history. Follow the recipe below to bake one of Emily Dickinson's favorite cakes! This program has been sponsored by White Oak Pastures. Thanks to Four Lincolns for today's music.

"It's really important that the research be solid on the site. I have open comments; I want readers to be able to interact with the content." [9:45]

"One of the things that really fascinates me is connecting to a historical person and seeing what they were eating or cooking." [12:50]

-- Tori Avey on A Taste of the Past

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Emily Dickinson's Coconut Cake

2 cups flour

1 tsp cream of tartar + 1/2 tsp baking soda OR 1 1/2 tsp baking powder

1 cup sugar

1/2 cup unsalted butter, room temperature

2 eggs

1/2 cup milk

1 cup shredded coconut

Preheat your oven to 325 degrees F. In a large mixing bowl, sift together the flour and cream of tartar + baking soda OR baking powder. I used my antique sifter to get in the "Emily Dickinson" mood.

In a medium mixing bowl, cream the butter and sugar together till the mixture is light and fluffy, and the sugar is well incorporated into the butter. I did this by hand, the old fashioned way, like Emily Dickinson would have. It took several minutes. You can do it much faster with an electric mixer.

Mix in the eggs, then the milk.

Add liquid ingredients to dry and stir till just incorporated. A thick batter will form. Do not overmix.

Fold in the shredded coconut. If your shredded coconut is dry (not fresh), rehydrate it with a little warm water and drain well before mixing it into the batter. Again, don't overmix.

Spread the batter into a small loaf pan.

Bake the cake for 50-60 minutes on the middle rack of your oven till cooked through and golden brown around the edges. Test with a skewer or toothpick for doneness in a few places-- if the toothpick comes out clean (no wet batter sticking to it), it's done.

The cake is not overly sweet, which was perfect for me (I don't like my desserts too sweet). If you want to sweeten it up, use a bit more sugar, or use sweetened coconut instead of regular coconut. Enjoy!


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On today’s episode of The Food Seen, “Big Bad Chef” John Currence, heads north from New Orleans, finding his home, and his calling, in Oxford, Mississippi. With him, he brought the culinary archaeology of his heritage, taking cues from the Gulf Coast, and inflecting his food with Southern traditions. As a member of the Southern Foodways Alliance, John’s penchant to preserve and proliferate regional cuisine in America’s South, from techniques like pickling, canning, brining, smoking, and slathering, allows him to playfully riff on gumbo, while honoring the past. In his first cookbook, Pickles, Pigs & Whiskey, not only denotes his 3 favorite food groups, but shares recipes from his beloved restaurants such as City Grocery, Snackbar, Big Bad Breakfast, Bouré, and Lamar Lounge. Make yourself a drink, turn on some music, and rock out to some Southern hospitality. This program was brought to you by White Oak Pastures.

"Mississippi is sort of a strange place. We spend a lot of time doing culinary archaeology. The city doesn't have a whole lot of definable food-ways." [8:00]

"There's nothing in the world that I quite love like making dinner for my wife, and not just because I can't make anything she doesn't like." [22:00]

--John Currence on The Food Seen


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