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This week on What Doesn't Kill You, Katy Keiffer chats with Patrick Martins about his book, The Carnivore's Manifesto: Eating Well, Eating Responsibly, and Eating Meat. The book features fifty ways to be an enlightened carnivore, while taking better care of our planet and ourselves. We have evolved as meat eaters, proclaims Patrick Martins, and it's futile to deny it. But, given the destructive forces of the fast-food industry and factory farming, we need to make smart, informed choices about the food we eat and where it comes from. In 50 short chapters, Martins cuts through organize zealotry and the misleading jargon of food labeling to outline realistic steps everyone can take to be part of the sustainable-food movement.

"If there's a truth out there - that truth applies to everybody whether you're rich or poor, black or white. The elitism argument [in food] demeans poor people." [13:00]

"We need more farms producing more food for more Americans. That's one of the goals of this book." [16:00]

--Patrick Martins on What Doesn't Kill You


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Grains take center stage on this week's episode of A Taste of the Past as host Linda Pelaccio is joined by Bruce Weinstein, cooking instructor and author of "Grain Mains: 101 Surprising and Satisfying Whole Grain Recipes for Every Meal of the Day". Tune in for a lively discussion on grains and their place in culinary history. From quinoa to millet, learn about how whole grains were essential in early China and how they differ from refined grains. From health benefits to culinary applications, Bruce gives listeners plenty to digest on this week's episode of A Taste of the Past. This program was sponsored by White Oak Pastures.

"Millet was the grain of China before rice. Some of the oldest pastas found in China were made of millet flour."

"If you eat whole grain cereal for breakfast you'll be less hungry later than you would if you ate regular sugary cereal."

"Seasonings and flavors have been dumbed down across the board. As a society - we've grown accustomed to more tasteless food that's been over-processed."

"Grains are for everybody - they're not just for the vegans and vegetarians among us!"

--Bruce Weinstein on A Taste of the Past


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Michael Krondl is talking Easter sweets on this week's episode of A Taste of the Past! Michael joins Linda Pelaccio in the studio to shed some light on some confusing Easter mythology. Why do we give chocolate bunnies at Easter time? Why are rabbits and eggs Easter symbols? Also, listen in to learn the history behind eating sweet bread during the Easter holiday. Hear about other ancient spring celebrations, and find out what foods were eaten to improve fertility. How do desserts differ across Europe, and how do their traditions help distinguish desserts from everyday breads? Celebrate Easter on today's episode of A Taste of the Past! This program has been sponsored by Hearst Ranch.

"Bread has a very complicated meaning (in fertility holidays). In Christianity, bread represents the body of Christ. The idea of having these breads for Easter ties in with Christianity, but it probably came before Christianity in Europe." [4:00]

"Sweet things used to be rare and expensive. They used to be associated with the priest class." [27:20]

-- Michael Krondl on A Taste of the Past


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