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This week on The Morning After, Host Jessie Kiefer welcomes back Co-Host Sari Kamin after her European excursion! Erin Sylvester also joins the program for a special ode to a beloved restaurant. In the first half of the show, the duo bring on Katrina Moore, director of the documentary, Under the Mango Tree: Food, Health, and Love in Ghana. What started out as a school trip to Ghana, Katrina became inspired by a Ghanian doctor, Dr. Abdulai, struggling to care for his community against all odds. She then decided to turn the experience into a meaningful way to fulfill her Master's thesis in New York University's Food Studies program. After creating an IndieGogo account to raise necessary funds, the project has started to garner support from around the world. Check out the link here to contribute. Later, Sari shares all about her adventures eating around Europe! Tune in for a packed show. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

"The doctor [Dr. Abdulai] saw that the homeless tended to behave very wildly in the streets. They would steal food from the women in the markets...they would be very violent...so the doctor would see that and named it as hunger because he knew hunger. He grew up hungry on the streets of Tamale himself." [18:06]

"The title Under the Mango Tree comes from the doctor's first surgery at the clinic location... The first surgery performed before there were any buildings was performed under this huge mango tree that now provides food and shade and beauty to the clinic grounds." [22:31]

-- Katrina Moore on The Morning After


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Adam Shprintzen discusses 19th Century vegetarianism in his book, The Vegetarian Crusade. This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio talks with Adam about the roots of meat abstention in the 19th Century with the British Bible Christians. How was vegetarianism related to the American Reform Movement and the murmurings of temperance? Tune into this episode to find out how the American Vegetarian Society organized disparaging groups of non-meat eaters. Have vegetarians faced vitriol throughout history? Learn how food entrepreneurs like Harvey Kellogg and Sylvester Graham helped spur on the spread of vegetarianism. What are the parallels between 19th Century vegetarianism and its form in the modern day? Find out all of this and more on this week's edition of A Taste of the Past! Thanks to our sponsor, Consider Bardwell. Music by Obey City.

"The 19th Century was not only a time when people were thinking about reform, but also a time when people were thinking about ways to live a better life. People were abstaining from alcohol, rethinking sexual relationships with the 'free love' movement... It only makes sense that people were also considering changing their diets." [6:00]

"Today, vegetarianism is marketed in a very personal way!" [31:25]

-- Adam Shprintzen on A Taste of the Past


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What differentiates an herb from a weed? And what historical significance do herbs hold? Today's episode of A Taste of the Past is a culinary history of herbs. Linda Pelaccio is joined by Gary Allen, herbalist and author of the recent book, Herbs: A Global History. Tune in to hear the difference between herbs and spices. Learn about extinct herbal plants and their ancient uses. Hear about the exchange of regional herbs, and how it has changed the culinary landscape and the food we eat today. Culturally, herbs are symbols for for memory, love, and fidelity. How did these associations come to be? Find out this, and so much more on this week's A Taste of the Past. This episode has been sponsored by Whole Foods.

"Technically herbal teas are not teas- they are infusions. True tea is only the tea plant: camellia sinensis."

"All foods are fusion foods, because every time anyone runs into anyone from anywhere they adapt their dishes to new ingredients and new circumstances."

"Rosemary is often associated with memory because its scent lingers for so long."

-- Gary Allen on A Taste of the Past


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