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Is there anything inherently wrong with the way snack foods are developed and marketed? How much responsibility should rest on the consumer versus the manufacturer in matters of labeling and marketing? Do the food industry's attempts to offer more nutritious products reflect a genuine concern for public health? On June 19th, The MOFAD Roundtable tackled these questions through a lively debate among experts in market research, consumer advocacy, and public health.

Speakers:

Michele Simon, President, Eat Drink Politics
Howard Moskowitz, Chairman, iNovum; Chairman, Institute for Competitive Excellence, Queens College (CUNY)
Christina Roberto, Assistant Professor of Social & Behavioral Sciences and Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health
Derek Yach, Executive Director, the Vitality Institute

Moderated by

Dave Arnold, Founder, Museum of Food and Drink

For more:

Twitter: @MOFAD or #MOFADRoundtable

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Betty Crocker is not, and never was, a real person - but that doesn't change the effect she had on generations of people in America. Learn more about the history of the iconic Betty Crocker on this episode of A Taste of the Past! Linda Pelaccio is joined by Susan Marks, author of Finding Better Crocker. Discover the many faces of the marketing genius that is Betty Crocker - from her early radio and television personalities, to her picture cookbooks. Hear how her image shifted from motherly to friendly as General Mills tried to ensure that the masses would feel comfortable with Betty. If you've ever leafed through a Betty Crocker cookbook or made cake with the famous mix, tune in and hear the entire story behind the fictitious homemaker. This program was sponsored by Whole Foods. Thanks to The California Honeydrops for today's break music.

"Betty Crocker was on the cutting edge of radio, and was on television too. There were always contests and coupons - especially if you wrote to Betty. If you had a question for Betty, it was guaranteed that it would be answered." [11:00]

"Real people are fallible- corporate icons are not. Real women have egos- and sometimes, like in the case of Martha Stewart - they even end up in jail." [21:00]

-- Susan Marks on A Taste of the Past


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"A cold chain is a supply chain that transports and stores temperature sensitive perishable goods. The most visible manifestation of the cold chain is the electric household refrigerator." - Jonathan Rees

The world was changed by the innovation of refrigeration. This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is joined by Dr. Jonathan Rees. Dr. Rees is a professor of history at Colorado State University - Pueblo, and the author of Refrigeration Nation. Tune in to hear about the origins of the ice industry and ice boxes, and learn about 'the cold chain'. Find out how compression refrigeration developed during the Civil War era, and why the marketing of refrigerators in the 1940s relied on size. Learn why cold storage was a controversial political issue, and how refrigeration was essential to the development of the supermarket. How were frozen foods received upon their arrival? Find out on this week's edition of A Taste of the Past! This program has been sponsored by Regional Access. Music by Jack Inslee.

"Ice was something that all classes were interested in, whether or not all classes could afford it." [5:50]

"Producing food and having it spoil is just as harmful to the environment as refrigeration." [17:10]

-- Dr. Jonathan Rees on A Taste of the Past


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