Search Results
First Aired - 02/26/2012 04:30PM Download MP3 (Full Episode)
Hosted By
Bdhbigger
Sponsored by
Fairway
This week on Burning Down the House, Curtis B. Wayne has a modular-minded conversation with Joseph Tanney of Resolution: 4 Architecture. Joseph specializes in modular, panelized and sustainable prefabricated homes and explains his thinking behind this method of home-building. Find out why he sees the kitchen island as the hearth of the home, and how budget and restraint play into the role of the architect. This program was brought to you by Fairway Market.

"We consider the kitchen as the plan generator. Frank Lloyd Wright used to think of the fireplace as the hearth of the home, we think of the kitchen island as the same."

"One of the problems [architects] have is not knowing how much something will cost before we design it."

--Architect Joseph Tanney of Resolution: 4 Architecture on Burning Down the House


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

First Aired - 01/31/2010 03:30PM Download MP3 (Full Episode)
Hosted By
Wdp
Sponsored by
Wfm
This week's episode of We Dig Plants expands on last week's topic of indoor plants by teaching you how to take the best care of them.
Jump to Segment:
Tags:
light, photosynthesis, as a gardener you can control this, three components, first: direction the light is coming from, second: how long does the light penetrate through window?, obstacles like over hangs and blinds can get in the way, third: light quality, glass plays into this, is the light clear?, is there a UV block or are windows tinted?, a light meter can help detect this but there are other guidelines to evaluate this, the best is in the southern or southeast window, least amount of light intensity is in the north windows, placement of plant is very important, away from window, a room that doesn't have light sometimes has reflective light, soil: compost or shredded bark, charcoal is used with air plants, for absorbent purposes, spongy moss for plants like orchids, retains moisture and drains well, roots from the royal fern, pearlite that looks like styrofoam, styrofoam peanuts when used for plants that need good drainage, also good for hiding underneath soil for potted plants, humidity of 50 to 60 percent, many homes average only 5 percent, plants absorb moisture in many ways, dry environments are bad for plants, indirect light or diffused light like the philodendron should come through partial shade, provides nutrients, Pete moss helps with moisture and structure,
Tags:
nitrogen in fertilizer, used for strong and vigorous growth, phosphorous, used for good root growth, third is potassium, look for clues on your bag of fertilizer for volume percentages, if the bag reads 15 15 15 there is 15 percent of each, the first is Nitrogen second Phosphorous and third is for Potassium, organic has become a pretty political term, organic soil should list ingredients such as kelp or bone it is probably organic, organic versus synthetic, organic is slowly broken down by plant, compost prevents many problems and gives nutrient to soil, try to avoid hard water, insect pests, four top offenders, aphids: pear shaped in colors like black or orange, indoors other bugs won't be able to eat them, usually found on plant tips where they damage by leaving disease, mealy bugs are big and are mobile and sometime look like cotton, they hide where stem meets leaf, they literally suck the life out of the plant, scale insect, spider mites, love very dry conditions, best to wash off plant and increase humidity, hose them off with strong jets of water and wipe down plant leaves,

To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

Debuts At - Unscheduled Download MP3 (Full Episode)
Hosted By
Nelson
Sponsored by
Edw116_150x150_042910sm
In Part I of Out To Pasture, Nelson Harvey riffs on the history of the NYC meat trade and the challenges faced by local farmers struggling amidst a paucity of New York State slaughterhouses and a rising demand for local meat.
Jump to Segment:
Tags:
Nelson Harvey, meeting the demand for local meat in NYC and beyond, heritage pigs, grassfed beef, Manhattan central stockyard, farmers brought live animals to town where butchers would buy them and slaughter them on the spot, Gustavus Swift started slaughtering animals in Chicago and transporting refrigerated carcasses, Swift saved money by avoiding putting whole live animals on trains and only shipping the parts of the animal that people will actually eat, prices of beef dropped 20%, drop made beef America's most popular meat, NYC slaughter houses close, network of stockyards fell by wayside, Chicago replaces New York as city of meat, Gustavus Swift was Nelson's great great great grandfather, eating locally has become a fashion and political statement, the rockstar appeal of butchers, demand for local meat in NYC exceeds supply, more than 650,000 tons of meat flown into NYC every year, could New York ever be a center of meat production again?, in 1800's cattle buyers and butchers appraised meat for purchase at stockyards, farmers and butchers racing to meet demands,
Tags:
Judith LaBelle, Glynwood Center: working to find ways to save farming in the Northeast, total farmland in tristate area decreased by more than 18% from 1974 to 2002, what's been happening to all of this farmaland, strong development pressure for second homes, high costs of doing business near the city, national forces: growth of agribusiness and industrial farming, recently there has been a counter trend: change in type of farming and more small farms reflecting the growth of consumer demand and direct sales, who is farming now?, what types of farms are predominant in Hudson Valley, big mix of types of production, nearly 1000 square miles of farmland left in the Hudson Valley, in today's market a farmer producing niche vegetables on a few acres might have a higher net income than a beef or dairy producer on a few hundred, growing market for direct sales to restaurants or CSA's, farmers making more by selling direct, relationship between number of slaughterhouses in Hudson Valley and number of farmers, why raise livestock if you're not confident you can get it to market and get a good price?, at the moment only four USDA slaughterhouses in Hudson Valley and all are operating at capacity, animals are often butchered inproperly, mobile slaughter facilities?, Glynwood working to develop a mobile slaughterhouse,

To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER

PARTNERS
FEATURED EVENTS