Search Results
Hosted By
Let_s-get-real
Sponsored by
Cain-logotype-hrn-150
Today's episode of Let's Get Real is all about identity crises. How do you know what you're supposed to taste like if you're a boo berry? How has foodiness committed crimes against nature? Why shouldn't you send your kids to art school? Erica Wides makes sense of it all on another poignant and reflective episode of Let's Get Real. This program was brought to you by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"Mama's don't let you babies grow up to attend art school - that's how the song should go." [03:00]

--Erica Wides on Let's Get Real


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

Hosted By
Tasteofthepast
Sponsored by
Edw116_150x150_042910sm
This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio talks about the history of ramen in Japan and the United States with George Solt, author of The Untold History of Ramen. Tune into this episode to learn how international relations and trade agreements allowed ramen to evolve in Japan using non-traditional ingredients. How do ramen noodles different from other Japanese noodle soups like soba? How did ramen preparations change in order to satisfy the caloric needs of the Japanese population. Tune into this program to learn more about the first instances of instant ramen, ramen museum, and the dish's nutritional value! Are ramen shops in Japan as popular as their equivalents in the United States today? Tune in to find out! Thanks to our sponsor, S. Wallace Edwards & Sons. Music by Pamela Royal.

"Until the introduction of Western food culture en mass in the 19th Century, the Japanese didn't eat much meat; it was much more of fish and vegetable type of eating culture... It shows how politics, international relations, and trade affect food culture." [6:50]

"The pushcart is really the site that the ramen phenomenon came from." [9:20]

-- George Solt on A Taste of the Past


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

Hosted By
Tasteofthepast
Sponsored by
Hearst_logo
This week on A Taste of the Past, host Linda Pelaccio is joined by Canadian food writer Noami Duguid, who has authored seminal books such as "Seductions of Rice" and "Burma: Rivers of Flavor". Tune in and hear what it's like being an outsider in a foreign land and how Noami navigates cultures and communities to learn about the cuisine that lives amongst them. Find out how the politically oppressed people of Burma operate in their kitchens what makes their food simultaneously accessible and unique. From fish paste to garlic, discover the layered flavors of Burma and the delicious dishes that come from them. This program was sponsored by Hearst Ranch.

"I'm always a beginner - wherever I am. I will never be an expert. All I'm trying to do is get my head in a place where I have some understand of what grows there, how people think about their food, how things are made, what's important to them and what's not important of them." [3:43]

"I didn't want to talk about the people of Burma as victims because we think of victims as less than whole." [9:00]

"In Burmese culture, people use tea leaves in salad. They ferment them, use them fresh or dried." [21:00]

"My problem with breakfast in Burma is there are so many things I want to eat!" [26:50]

"Food is an entry point - it's a way of understanding how things work." [28:30]

-- Noami Duguid on A Taste of the Past


To comment on this episode click here. There are currently Comments

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER

PARTNERS
FEATURED EVENTS