S H O W  S C H E D U L E
SUNDAY
12:OO - 12:45 /// The Main Course
1:OO-1:3O /// Eat Your Words
2:OO-2:3O /// Arts & Seizures
3:OO-4:OO /// The Morning After
4:3O-5:3O /// Snacky Tunes
6:OO-6:3O /// Joshua David Stein Variety Hour...Half Hour
MONDAY
1O:OO-1O:3O /// Wild Game Domain
11:OO-11:3O /// Inside School Food
12:OO-12:3O /// What Doesn't Kill You
1:OO-1:3O /// Radio Cherry Bombe
3:OO-3:4O /// We Dig Plants
5:OO-5:3O /// Cutting the Curd
6:OO-6:3O /// Animal Instinct
7:OO-7:3O /// Fuhmentaboudit!
8:OO-8:3O /// Eating Disorder
TUESDAY
12:OO-12:45 /// Cooking Issues
1:OO-1:3O /// Let's Get Real
2:OO-2:3O /// Sharp & Hot
3:OO-3:3O /// The Food Seen
4:OO-4:3O /// Greenhorns Radio
5:OO-5:45 /// Beer Sessions Radio (TM)
7:OO-7:3O /// Roberta's Radio
WEDNESDAY
1O:OO - 1O:3O /// In the Drink
11:OO-11:3O /// Taste Matters
12:OO-12:45 /// Chef's Story
1:OO - 1:3O /// After the Jump
2:OO-2:45/// WORD OF MOUTH
3:OO-3:3O /// The Speakeasy
4:OO-4:45 /// All in the Industry
5:OO-5:3O /// the business of The Business
THURSDAY
11:OO - 11:3O /// Native
12:OO - 12:3O /// A Taste of the Past
1:OO - 1:3O /// The Farm Report
2:OO-2:3O /// Pizza Party
3:OO-3:3O /// Eating Matters
4:OO - 5:OO /// Food Talk with Mike Colameco
6:OO-6:45 /// Mama Coco's Funky Kitchen
7:3O-8:3O /// Full Service Radio
9:OO-1O:3O /// GUNWASH
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Evolutionaries
My Welcome Table
How Great Cities Are Fed
PUNCH Radio
The Whole Shebang
Edible Alphabet
PAST PROGRAMS
No Chefs Allowed
Anastasia's Fridge
It's More Than Food
Straight from the Source
Metropolitan Ave
Summer of Food
HRN on Sandy
Micology
Everything's On the Table
Hot Grease
U Look Hungry
The Naturalist
Burning Down the House
Search Results
Hosted By
Tasteofthepast
Sponsored by
Bonnie
Darina Allen is an Irish chef, food writer, TV personality, and founder of the Ballymaloe Cookery School in Schanagarry, County Cork, Ireland. In this week's episode of A Taste of the Past, Darina explains the current state of Irish food and culture in our society today, bringing us back to the history of Irish culture from the beginning. Darina also talks about founding the Ballymaloe Cookery School, the only cookery school in the world located in the middle of its own 100-acre organic farm. As a result, the school is completely self-sufficient, and people can come for a simple afternoon cooking class, or a full course designed to take the amateur cook further in his or her studies. Hear about Darina's book, Irish Traditional Cooking (published by Kyle Books), and how she hopes to reconnect us with the cooking skills that have been forgotten for generations. This program has been sponsored by Bonnie Plants.

"Its not just about economics, it's about the whole quality life - an appreciation for the quality of life." [16:50]

"We need to be able to cook, to sit down around the table again." [23:10]

-- Darina Allen on A Taste of the Past


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Hosted By
The-food-seen-new
Sponsored by
Untitled
On today’s episode of The Food Seen, “Big Bad Chef” John Currence, heads north from New Orleans, finding his home, and his calling, in Oxford, Mississippi. With him, he brought the culinary archaeology of his heritage, taking cues from the Gulf Coast, and inflecting his food with Southern traditions. As a member of the Southern Foodways Alliance, John’s penchant to preserve and proliferate regional cuisine in America’s South, from techniques like pickling, canning, brining, smoking, and slathering, allows him to playfully riff on gumbo, while honoring the past. In his first cookbook, Pickles, Pigs & Whiskey, not only denotes his 3 favorite food groups, but shares recipes from his beloved restaurants such as City Grocery, Snackbar, Big Bad Breakfast, Bouré, and Lamar Lounge. Make yourself a drink, turn on some music, and rock out to some Southern hospitality. This program was brought to you by White Oak Pastures.

"Mississippi is sort of a strange place. We spend a lot of time doing culinary archaeology. The city doesn't have a whole lot of definable food-ways." [8:00]

"There's nothing in the world that I quite love like making dinner for my wife, and not just because I can't make anything she doesn't like." [22:00]

--John Currence on The Food Seen


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Hosted By
The-farm-report
Sponsored by
Cain-logotype-hrn-150
This week on The Farm Report, host Erin Fairbanks is talking cheese! On the line with Laurie Davis, Coordinator of Adirondack Harvest, a non-profit organization operating as a program of Cornell Cooperative Extension Association of Essex County, NY, it's the largest local food initiative and brand of the Adirondack region. Laurie explains that the mission of the harvest envisions a picturesque and productive working landscape connecting local farmers to their communities and regional markets. The organization seeks to increase opportunities for profitable production and sale of high quality food and agricultural products and to expand consumer choices for locally produced healthy food. Erin next speaks with a few of the vendors associated with the Adirondack Harvest Essex County Cheese Tour, including Asgaard Farm & Dairy. Asgaard Farm & Dairy has been producing award-winning farmstead goat cheeses since 2008. Co-owner Rhonda Butler joins the show via phone and shares with Erin that their core products include fresh chevre, soft ripened cheeses in the tradition of France's Loire Valley, aged raw-milk feta and aged raw-milk tomme. Rhonda also explains the ins and outs of the farm operations, especially dealing with the farm's goats. Passing the phone to Steven Googin of North Country Creamery at Clover Mead Farm, Steven chats with Erin about the second year operating the farmstead creamery. Notably, he mentions this past spring they opened the Clover Mead Cafe and Farmstore, which allows customers to purchase goods directly from the creamery as well as other local producers. Rounding out the conversation, Erin welcomes Margot Brooks of Sugar House Creamery, who relays that while this is the first year of operation, they are currently producing four different types of cheeses, two of which are made with pasteurized milk while the rest are made with raw milk. Tune in for an extra-cheesy episode and to hear all the details associated with the Adirondack Harvest. This program was brought to you by Cain Vineyard and Winery.

"One of the charms of the Adirondacks is that so much of the land is either used for recreation or for agriculture or lumber, and that was one of the original visions of Adirondack Harvest: to keep the land working." [2:39]

--Laurie Davis on The Farm Report

"We started raising pigs, mostly because whey is a bi-product of cheese making and one has to do something with that whey... we get feeder pigs every spring and raise them largely the whey we produce from the creamery." [14:17]

--Rhonda Butler on The Farm Report

"I used to have a little black market, raw milk ring back in the day but I wanted to come to the other side and do it the right way." [22:23]

--Steven Googin on The Farm Report


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