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12:OO-12:45 /// Cooking Issues
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1O:OO - 1O:3O /// In the Drink
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THURSDAY
12:OO - 12:3O /// A Taste of the Past
1:OO - 1:3O /// The Farm Report
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How Great Cities Are Fed
Joshua David Stein Variety Hour...Half Hour
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the business of The Business
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Everything's On the Table
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Burning Down the House
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Hosted By
Snacky-tunes
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This week on Snacky Tunes, Darin Bresnitz and guest co-host Jordana Rothman, Food & Drink Editor at Time Out New York, flip the normal show format and welcome the musical guest Tal National with an energetic, danceable tune! Hailing from Niamey, the capital city of Niger, their music is joyously hypnotic, a highly unique contribution to West African guitar music. With its lightening fast rhythms and rotating cast of vocalists, this makes for a unique Snacky Tunes experience! Darin and Jordana ask how a group known for its five hour sets can contain that energy in an album that only lasts so long, such as their new album Zoy Zoy, out now on Fat Cat Records. Have they enjoyed their time in NYC? Have they found good Nigerian food on the road? Tune in for answers and amazing live music. In the second half of the show, Heritage Radio Network host of The Main Course and neighbor/owner of Momo Sushi Shack, Phillip Gilmour joins in the fun talking about his new sandwich shop venture "Hi Hello!" located off the Jefferson subway stop in Brooklyn. Talking about why he decided to go from sushi to the sandwich biz, Phil elaborates how disappointed he'd been in other sandwiches and how he decided to change that for himself. Sifting through interesting ingredient combinations as well as Jordana's thoughts on brunch, Phil shares thoughts on being a restauranteur and the message he's trying to spread with food. This program was brought to you by Whole Foods Market.

"What makes a bad sandwich is people either don't use enough salt, enough spice, or enough acid." [35:44]

"I'm not a one trick pony. I'm not just obsessed with Japanese things, I'm obsessed with life!" [54:08]

--Phillip Gilmour on Snacky Tunes


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Hosted By
Tasteofthepast
Sponsored by
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From dal to samosas, paneer to vindaloo, dosa to naan, today's A Taste of the Past is delving into the history of the food in India. Host Linda Pelaccio welcomes guest Colleen Taylor Sen, a culinary historian and writer who has specialized in the cuisine of the Indian subcontinent, to the show to dissect this country's rich culinary traditions. The cuisine differs from north to south, yet what is it that makes Indian food recognizably Indian, and how did it get that way? To answer those questions, Colleen and her recently released book "Feasts and Fasts: History of Food in India" examine the diet of the Indian subcontinent for thousands of years, describing the country’s cuisine in the context of its religious, moral, social, and philosophical development. After the break, Colleen talks about India's beliefs in food as medicine as it pertains to Ayurveda plus much more. This program was brought to you by Underground Meats.

"One vegetable that's played a key role in Indian cuisine is the eggplant...in my research I kept coming across the eggplant, probably because of its ability to absorb flavors." [4:05]

"Very few Indians are vegans, so dairy products are always a part of people's diets." [14:10]

"Someone could write book after book on Indian sweets!" [26:20]

--Colleen Taylor Sen on A Taste of the Past


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Hosted By
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Sponsored by
Untitled
What foods were historical figures like Emily Dickinson, Benjamin Franklin, and Leonardo Da Vinci eating during their lifetimes? On this week's episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio chats with Tori Avey- author and food writer- and the editor and curator of TheHistoryKitchen.com! Tori, who also serves as the chair for the IACP Food History Section, became interested in history through her grandparents, and was always fascinated by the kitchen. Hear how Tori combined her two loves by researching Jewish cuisine, and how that research fueled TheHistoryKitchen.com. Later, hear Linda and Tori talk about the importance of referencing primary sources in culinary history. Follow the recipe below to bake one of Emily Dickinson's favorite cakes! This program has been sponsored by White Oak Pastures. Thanks to Four Lincolns for today's music.

"It's really important that the research be solid on the site. I have open comments; I want readers to be able to interact with the content." [9:45]

"One of the things that really fascinates me is connecting to a historical person and seeing what they were eating or cooking." [12:50]

-- Tori Avey on A Taste of the Past

-------------------------------------

Emily Dickinson's Coconut Cake

2 cups flour

1 tsp cream of tartar + 1/2 tsp baking soda OR 1 1/2 tsp baking powder

1 cup sugar

1/2 cup unsalted butter, room temperature

2 eggs

1/2 cup milk

1 cup shredded coconut

Preheat your oven to 325 degrees F. In a large mixing bowl, sift together the flour and cream of tartar + baking soda OR baking powder. I used my antique sifter to get in the "Emily Dickinson" mood.

In a medium mixing bowl, cream the butter and sugar together till the mixture is light and fluffy, and the sugar is well incorporated into the butter. I did this by hand, the old fashioned way, like Emily Dickinson would have. It took several minutes. You can do it much faster with an electric mixer.

Mix in the eggs, then the milk.

Add liquid ingredients to dry and stir till just incorporated. A thick batter will form. Do not overmix.

Fold in the shredded coconut. If your shredded coconut is dry (not fresh), rehydrate it with a little warm water and drain well before mixing it into the batter. Again, don't overmix.

Spread the batter into a small loaf pan.

Bake the cake for 50-60 minutes on the middle rack of your oven till cooked through and golden brown around the edges. Test with a skewer or toothpick for doneness in a few places-- if the toothpick comes out clean (no wet batter sticking to it), it's done.

The cake is not overly sweet, which was perfect for me (I don't like my desserts too sweet). If you want to sweeten it up, use a bit more sugar, or use sweetened coconut instead of regular coconut. Enjoy!


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