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Nicholas Freudenberg is Distinguished Professor of Public Health at CUNY’s School of Public Health at Hunter College. He is also co-director of the New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College. He has written or edited five books and more than 75 scientific articles on urban health policy, HIV prevention, community mobilization for health and the role of food policy in health. Recently, Nicholas wrote Lethal but Legal, a book outlining the 'corporate consumption complex'. Tune into this week's edition of What Doesn't Kill You to hear Nicholas uncover the roots of corporate dominance, the problems with current tax laws, and externalization. Why should government be the only type of organization to monitor industry? How can a society overturn the 'corporate consumption complex' and expose the problems of globalization? Find out all of this and more on this week's episode of What Doesn't Kill You! Thanks to our sponsor, S. Wallace Edwards & Sons.

"Companies propose voluntary guidelines that are much looser than what public health professionals suggest, and then they don't even follow those guidelines!" [14:35]

"Today many regulatory agencies lack the resources, but only government- as an independent voice- can monitor these industries." [16:00]

-- Nicholas Freudenberg on What Doesn't Kill You


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Composting and recycling at school isn't just about eco-friendly waste diversion. It also provides students with a powerful lesson in sound environmental practice that they'll carry with them for the rest of their lives. The message is simple: what comes from the earth can be returned to enrich it, so it can provide for us again and again. How to get started? Today's guests, from San Francisco, CA and Northampton, MA, will tell you how: Start small. Champion your early adopters. Develop educational and marketing tools to enlist the support of the entire school community. Or use materials from other districts--there's lots out there already! Thanks to today's sponsor, Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"A big part of San Francisco's 'Zero Waste' initiative hopes to be achieved through education... we have a 63% landfill diversion rate in San Francisco schools." [6:00]

"We prefer starting with the kids and hope the adults catch on... We understand the power that kids have." [14:20]

-- Tamar Hurwitz on Inside School Food

"We did underestimate how difficult it would be to get all of the students to sort their food waste properly; it was difficult to get everyone on board." [27:30]

-- Anna Moore on Inside School Food


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Is there anything inherently wrong with the way snack foods are developed and marketed? How much responsibility should rest on the consumer versus the manufacturer in matters of labeling and marketing? Do the food industry's attempts to offer more nutritious products reflect a genuine concern for public health? On June 19th, The MOFAD Roundtable tackled these questions through a lively debate among experts in market research, consumer advocacy, and public health.

Speakers:

Michele Simon, President, Eat Drink Politics
Howard Moskowitz, Chairman, iNovum; Chairman, Institute for Competitive Excellence, Queens College (CUNY)
Christina Roberto, Assistant Professor of Social & Behavioral Sciences and Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health
Derek Yach, Executive Director, the Vitality Institute

Moderated by

Dave Arnold, Founder, Museum of Food and Drink

For more:

Twitter: @MOFAD or #MOFADRoundtable

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