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Let_s-get-real
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Today's episode of Let's Get Real is all about identity crises. How do you know what you're supposed to taste like if you're a boo berry? How has foodiness committed crimes against nature? Why shouldn't you send your kids to art school? Erica Wides makes sense of it all on another poignant and reflective episode of Let's Get Real. This program was brought to you by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"Mama's don't let you babies grow up to attend art school - that's how the song should go." [03:00]

--Erica Wides on Let's Get Real


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Today on Chef's Story Michelle Weaver comes to us from Charleston Grill in Charleston, South Carolina to talk with us about her chef's story! A native from the south and growing up in Alabama, Chef Michelle Weaver was raised with a passion for cooking, from learning at an early age the importance of farm-to-table, to growing up cooking with the freshest ingredients from her mother’s extensive garden and farm, and experiencing the true taste of the soil. Upon receiving her formal training from the New England Culinary Institute which taught her the intimate, hands on approach, Chef Weaver first began her journey as an intern in the French-style kitchen of Chef Daniel Bonnot. Following school, Chef Weaver began cooking in the kitchen of Chef Bob Waggoner at The Wild Boar restaurant in Nashville and subsequently moved with him in 1997 when he took over at Charleston Grill. Working as the Executive Sous Chef, Chef Weaver eventually stepped into the spotlight as the hotel's Executive Chef, part of the Charleston Place Hotel, an Orient-Express property. Tune-in to truly learn and understand the passion needed to becoming a chef, and how Chef Weaver was able to get to her position today. This program has been sponsored by White Oak Pastures.

"At first I wanted to be a marketing director, but I kept coming back to food and beverages." [13:20]

"Charleston was a port city, all of these influences influence the cuisine, and create change." [39:10]

-- Michelle Weaver on Chef's Story


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Hosted By
Tasteofthepast
Sponsored by
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This week on A Taste of the Past, host Linda Pelaccio is joined by Canadian food writer Noami Duguid, who has authored seminal books such as "Seductions of Rice" and "Burma: Rivers of Flavor". Tune in and hear what it's like being an outsider in a foreign land and how Noami navigates cultures and communities to learn about the cuisine that lives amongst them. Find out how the politically oppressed people of Burma operate in their kitchens what makes their food simultaneously accessible and unique. From fish paste to garlic, discover the layered flavors of Burma and the delicious dishes that come from them. This program was sponsored by Hearst Ranch.

"I'm always a beginner - wherever I am. I will never be an expert. All I'm trying to do is get my head in a place where I have some understand of what grows there, how people think about their food, how things are made, what's important to them and what's not important of them." [3:43]

"I didn't want to talk about the people of Burma as victims because we think of victims as less than whole." [9:00]

"In Burmese culture, people use tea leaves in salad. They ferment them, use them fresh or dried." [21:00]

"My problem with breakfast in Burma is there are so many things I want to eat!" [26:50]

"Food is an entry point - it's a way of understanding how things work." [28:30]

-- Noami Duguid on A Taste of the Past


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