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How is farming tied to carbon and how does carbon keep life on earth possible? Find out on a very elemental and scientific episode of The Farm Report as host Erin Fairbanks is joined by Courtney White, the author of Grass, Soil, Hope. A former archaeologist and Sierra Club activist, White dropped out of the 'conflict industry' in 1997 to co-found the Quivira Coalition, a nonprofit dedicated to building bridges between ranchers, conservationists, public land managers, scientists, and others around the idea of land health. On today's show, Courtney explains what makes carbon such an essential part of the soil (and the earth) and introduces some alternative methods of farming that could help bring more carbon into our soil. The answer is biological farming - not chemical farming, and Courtney makes a clear case for out of the box thinking when it comes to our land and soil. Tune in and learn about the real issues in the ground and on the minds of sustainable agricultural thinkers everywhere. This program was brought to you by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"How carbon gets cycled is extremely important to maintaining life on this planet!" [02:45]

"We want biological farming not chemical farming." [05:16]

"If we want to store more carbon we have to stop killing the fungi in the soil." [07:36]

"If you have a practice that increases plant vigor and makes plants happy, you're storing more carbon in the soil." [12:40]

"Changes start in the margin, ideas start on the outside and move in over time...but how do you get them to speed up that journey to the center? That's tough. We need policy changes and we have such a dysfunctional political system right now" [20:42]

--Courtney White on The Farm Report


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Napa not only set the precedent for California wine quality, but continues to lead the state in growing excellent grapes and producing excellent wines. But why? The character and quality of Napa’s diverse wines is, in part, the result of the valley’s ideal soil, topography, and climate.

By Emma Hammond

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Water management is a serious issue - one that affects almost everything in the world of agriculture. How can you insure your crops against drought as a farmer? What happens when the rain won't fall? What are some new irrigation technologies that are helping keep crops healthy? Today's episode of What Doesn't Kill You is all about water - as host Katy Keiffer is joined by Claire O'Connor, the Agricultural Water Policy Analyst in the NRDC Santa Monica Office. She focuses on designing and implementing solutions to water challenges that are good for both farmers and people who eat the food that farmers grow. Tune in and wrap your head around some serious water issues on What Doesn't Kill You. This program was sponsored by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"The best insurance policy farmers have is their soil. Healthy soil can hold more water and absorb more water. That's where we need to be encouraging farmers to look at how they're managing their risk." [08:00]

"Unless we get serious about managing our water - it could be a big problem not only for farmers but all of us who like fruits and vegetables in this country." [21:00]

--Claire O'Connor on What Doesn't Kill You

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