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Tasteofthepast
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Michael Krondl is talking Easter sweets on this week's episode of A Taste of the Past! Michael joins Linda Pelaccio in the studio to shed some light on some confusing Easter mythology. Why do we give chocolate bunnies at Easter time? Why are rabbits and eggs Easter symbols? Also, listen in to learn the history behind eating sweet bread during the Easter holiday. Hear about other ancient spring celebrations, and find out what foods were eaten to improve fertility. How do desserts differ across Europe, and how do their traditions help distinguish desserts from everyday breads? Celebrate Easter on today's episode of A Taste of the Past! This program has been sponsored by Hearst Ranch.

"Bread has a very complicated meaning (in fertility holidays). In Christianity, bread represents the body of Christ. The idea of having these breads for Easter ties in with Christianity, but it probably came before Christianity in Europe." [4:00]

"Sweet things used to be rare and expensive. They used to be associated with the priest class." [27:20]

-- Michael Krondl on A Taste of the Past


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Fairway
This week on The Farm Report, Erin ushers in blueberry season! She welcomes Ed Flanagan, CEO of Wyman's of Maine to the program. Wyman's of Maine is a family owned company that specializes in the growing and marketing of wild blueberries. At the top of the show, Ed explains that Wyman's of Maine believes in the Japanese philosophy known as "kaizen," roughly translated as continuous improvement. Simply put: Wyman's has to do all they can to grow their business. Erin and Ed then delve in to discuss the details of the blueberry business, beginning with the distinctions between the wild and cultivated blueberry, Wyman's approach to the growing season, as well as the topic of honey bees and how vital they are to the business. With concerns such as colony collapse disorder, a strange phenomenon where worker bees abruptly disappear, Ed explains how Wyman's had to research, adapt and become invested in bee-keeping to further sustain their livelihood. Grab a smoothie and tune in for a great discussion on the super fruit! This program was sponsored by Fairway Market.

"A wild blueberry is much smaller, about three times smaller, than a cultivated blueberry. Generally, the flavor of a fruit is condensed around the skin, so in a handful of wild blueberries you're going to get more flavor." [7:14]

"We aspire to get to that point someday where we absolutely need no preventative chemicals." [12:50]

"What happened for us that was pretty good luck was right about the time that blueberries were being regarded as a healthy food was just about the same time that people started drinking smoothies." [19:45]

"We are out of business if there are no honey bees to put in our fields." [26:26]

--Ed Flanagan on The Farm Report


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Sponsored by
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This week on Just Food Stories, Jacquie welcomes Reverend Robert Ennis Jackson to the program to talk about his amazing work in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant. The Reverend has lent his hand in co-founding many organizations such as the Brooklyn Rescue Mission Urban Harvest Center, Healthy Harvest Food Pantries, Bedford-Stuyvesant Farm, among many others. Explaining his background and what inspired him to bring fresh and nutritious foods into Bedford-Stuyvesant, Reverend Jackson talks about transforming the current food system to promote the health of both consumers and producers, including partnering with Just Food on a chicken coop project. This program has been sponsored by Whole Foods Market.

"We saw that folks that were getting pantry food or donated food were getting less quality food. We had to figure out how to get fresh, healthy, organic, conventional food into the hands of pantry guests, so we started Bed-Stuy Farm." [6:20]

"Our first farm year was about people who were getting out of addiction, helping us clear the land, and seniors helping us plant food, and enjoying the partaking in eating that food." [8:50]

-- Reverend Robert Jackson on Just Food Stories


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