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Master the art of Southern cooking today on A Taste of the Past! This week, Linda Pelaccio is joined in the studio by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart, co-authors of the book Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking. Both Nathalie and Cynthia have had storied careers in the food world. How has the landscape changed for women in the kitchen? Hear Nathalie and Cynthia talk about the defining ingredients and flavors of Southern food, and the importance of eating real food. How do the foods in different regions of the South fit together into a concise cuisine? Learn more about the cooking techniques, recipe testing, and creativity that went into Nathalie and Cynthia's book! This program has been brought to you by White Oak Pastures.

"That's what I call 'the new Southern cooking movement' - when you take the fresh ingredients around you and use them in a classic way, or you use new vegetables in classic ways." [9:40] -- Nathalie Dupree on A Taste of the Past

"If you eat real food in modest portions, you're going to be so satisfied. It's when we restrict ourselves, go on crazy diets- that's when we get unsatisfied; you can't really satisfy that hunger." [15:00] -- Cynthia Graubart on A Taste of the Past


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Did you know that most Americans did not eat tuna until the 20th century? On this week's episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio sits down with Andrew F. Smith, a food historian and author of the recent book, American Tuna: The Rise and Fall of an Improbable Food. Learn about how Mediterranean immigrant populations popularized the fish in the United States, and how the Japanese made it a staple of culinary culture. Hear about how American preferences in terms of tuna preparation have changed over the decades, from canned to raw. With all of the media attention concerning methylmercury, is tuna still safe to eat? Tune in to learn more about the different varieties of tuna, population levels, and the role of sport fisherman in the tuna industry. This episode has been brought to you by Hearst Ranch.

"Once you remove the oil from it, it's actually a very mild-tasting fish. You can use it as a substitute in pretty much all of your chicken recipes."

"80% of the Bluefin tuna stock that was around in the 1970s is now gone. The thought used to be if we restricted catching, then we would give the population an opportunity to recover... There's no evidence that supports that."

-- Andrew F. Smith on A Taste of the Past


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Daisy Freund is the senior manager of the ASPCA’s Farm Animal Welfare campaign. In her role, Daisy works to raise public awareness about factory farming practices and improve the lives of farm animals in the U.S. through consumer education, legislative advocacy and farmer outreach. She is especially focused on driving increased transparency in the food system to allow consumers to make choices based on facts, and elevating farmers’ voices as advocates for more humane methods of farming. Daisy joined the ASPCA in 2012, bringing to the job a diversity of experience in food systems and communications, including farming, restaurant management, public relations and journalism. On today's episode of What Doesn't Kill You, Daisy, Katy Keiffer, and Sari Kamin discuss the poultry business. Tune in for more on the lack of genetic diversity in the factory-farmed chicken world, and why consumers are willing to pay a premium for quality in light of recent food-borne illness scandals. Why does poultry production rely so heavily on antibiotics? Later, learn more about animal stress, welfare protection on farms, and why so many companies are slowly turning to slow-growing birds. Thanks to our sponsor, Route 11 Potato Chips.

"The way these birds are treated is cruel, and it's at the expense of the chickens and people." [3:00]

"The genetic stock is available- we just have to convince this industry that people care about these issues... People are eager to spend a little more in order to get a little more value." [6:35]

-- Daisy Freund on What Doesn't Kill You


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