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This week on A Taste of the Past: is candy food? Linda Pelaccio interviews Samira Kawash, author of Candy: A Century of Panic and Pleasure. Samira explains to us how difficult it was to make candy back in the 1800s, and how technological innovations allowed the candy industry to boom. Later, she and Linda discuss society's perception of candy, how many other foods and beverages are less healthy, yet candy can be an easy scapegoat. This program has been sponsored by Many Kitchens. Today's music provided by Takstar.

"The tradition in the 19th century was candy was a luxury, and it was for special occasions." [9:40]

"I think it's easy to look at candy and see it as really the scapegoat of our anxieties around the role of sugar in our diet and the dangers of eating foods that are far away from the farm." [17:25]

--Samira Kawash on A Taste of the Past


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This week on A Taste of the Past, the subject is New York City food. Linda speaks with Andrew Smith, author of New York City: A Food Biography, about the history of food in New York City. Andrew brings us back thousands of years, and describes what the food culture were like throughout time. After the break, they discuss some specific food establishments such as the automat and the supermarket that imposed varying levels of change on the food industry in New York and nationwide. This program has been sponsored by Whole Foods Market. Today's music provided by Four Lincolns.

"From about the 1830's on, New York City became the major sugar refinery not just for the north but for the entire country." [15:25]

"New York is really the beginning of what we think of as bagels." [20:25]

Andrew Smith on A Taste of the Past


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Dave returns to the studio this week with tales of dog sledding in Sweden and opening up his new bar, Booker and Dax, in New York. Tune in to learn how to keep your meatballs from falling apart, what the Dextrose Equivalent scale is and how to use it, as well as helping those of you with fish allergies find something you can eat. This episode is sponsored by Modernist Pantry.

"When you're cook meatballs, you have to fry them BEFORE you cook them in a bag with butter. That will keep them from falling apart."

"I use Dextrose Equivalent 20 glucose syrup when I make ice cream and want to get the texture but not add too much sweetness."

--Dave Arnold on Cooking Issues


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