S H O W  S C H E D U L E
SUNDAY
12:OO - 12:45 /// The Main Course
1:OO-1:3O /// Eat Your Words
2:OO-2:3O /// Arts & Seizures
3:OO-4:OO /// The Morning After
4:3O-5:3O /// Snacky Tunes
6:OO-6:3O /// Joshua David Stein Variety Hour...Half Hour
MONDAY
1O:OO-1O:3O /// Wild Game Domain
11:OO-11:3O /// Inside School Food
12:OO-12:3O /// What Doesn't Kill You
1:OO-1:3O /// Radio Cherry Bombe
3:OO-3:4O /// We Dig Plants
5:OO-5:3O /// Cutting the Curd
6:OO-6:3O /// Animal Instinct
7:OO-7:3O /// Fuhmentaboudit!
8:OO-8:3O /// Eating Disorder
TUESDAY
12:OO-12:45 /// Cooking Issues
1:OO-1:3O /// Let's Get Real
2:OO-2:3O /// Sharp & Hot
3:OO-3:3O /// The Food Seen
4:OO-4:3O /// Greenhorns Radio
5:OO-5:45 /// Beer Sessions Radio (TM)
7:OO-7:3O /// Roberta's Radio
WEDNESDAY
1O:OO - 1O:3O /// In the Drink
11:OO-11:3O /// Taste Matters
12:OO-12:45 /// Chef's Story
1:OO - 1:3O /// After the Jump
2:OO-2:45/// WORD OF MOUTH
3:OO-3:3O /// The Speakeasy
4:OO-4:45 /// All in the Industry
5:OO-5:3O /// the business of The Business
THURSDAY
11:OO - 11:3O /// Native
12:OO - 12:3O /// A Taste of the Past
1:OO - 1:3O /// The Farm Report
2:OO-2:3O /// Pizza Party
3:OO-3:3O /// Eating Matters
4:OO - 5:OO /// Food Talk with Mike Colameco
6:OO-6:45 /// Mama Coco's Funky Kitchen
7:3O-8:3O /// Full Service Radio
9:OO-1O:3O /// GUNWASH
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Evolutionaries
My Welcome Table
How Great Cities Are Fed
PUNCH Radio
The Whole Shebang
Edible Alphabet
PAST PROGRAMS
No Chefs Allowed
Anastasia's Fridge
It's More Than Food
Straight from the Source
Metropolitan Ave
Summer of Food
HRN on Sandy
Micology
Everything's On the Table
Hot Grease
U Look Hungry
The Naturalist
Burning Down the House
Search Results
Hosted By
What-doesn_t-kill-you
Sponsored by
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Nicholas Freudenberg is Distinguished Professor of Public Health at CUNY’s School of Public Health at Hunter College. He is also co-director of the New York City Food Policy Center at Hunter College. He has written or edited five books and more than 75 scientific articles on urban health policy, HIV prevention, community mobilization for health and the role of food policy in health. Recently, Nicholas wrote Lethal but Legal, a book outlining the 'corporate consumption complex'. Tune into this week's edition of What Doesn't Kill You to hear Nicholas uncover the roots of corporate dominance, the problems with current tax laws, and externalization. Why should government be the only type of organization to monitor industry? How can a society overturn the 'corporate consumption complex' and expose the problems of globalization? Find out all of this and more on this week's episode of What Doesn't Kill You! Thanks to our sponsor, S. Wallace Edwards & Sons.

"Companies propose voluntary guidelines that are much looser than what public health professionals suggest, and then they don't even follow those guidelines!" [14:35]

"Today many regulatory agencies lack the resources, but only government- as an independent voice- can monitor these industries." [16:00]

-- Nicholas Freudenberg on What Doesn't Kill You


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Hosted By
Tasteofthepast
Sponsored by
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This week on A Taste of the Past, host Linda Pelaccio is feeling festive, talking the history of the turkey with food historian Andrew Smith. Teaching food history at the New School in NYC, he is also the author of numerous books and hundreds of articles on food and history. Speaking on the the centerpiece of family Thanksgiving reunions, the turkey is a cultural symbol as well as a multi-billion dollar industry. As a bird, dinner, commodity, and national icon, the turkey has become as American as the bald eagle. Sitting down with Linda, Andrew discusses how this new world bird landed on the world's tables starting with the bird's origins and first recipes, before bringing up the topic of pickled turkey. After the break, Andrew explains how the turkey overcame the traditional goose holiday dinner, variations of stuffing throughout the years, and the preservation of heritage turkey breeds. Tune in for this timely episode! This program was brought to you by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"Wild turkeys tend to taste very different depending on what they've consumed." [13:45]

"Serving turkey [on Thanksgiving] did not become universal until the late nineteenth century, though it was certainly on the menu." [26:20]

"In order to save the heritage turkeys you need to eat them." [30:00]

--Andrew Smith on A Taste of the Past


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Hosted By
Eating-matters
Sponsored by
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This week, on the very first episode of Eating Matters, host Kim Kessler kicks off the episode with a roundtable discussion on food news and policy with Cathy Nonas and Denis Stearns. Cathy is the Senior Advisor to the Bureau of Chronic Disease Prevention & Tobacco Control at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene while Denis was a founding partner of Marler Clark, LLP, PS, a Seattle-based law firm with a national practice devoted to the representation of persons injured by unsafe food and drink. After the break, Kim welcomes Ricardo Salvador, the senior scientist and director of the Food & Environment Program of the Union of Concerned Scientists. Kim talks with Ricardo about his role at the UCS which includes working with citizens, scientists, economists, and politicians to transition our current food system into one that grows healthy foods while employing sustainable practices. Tune in for an info-packed episode! This program was brought to you by The Tabard Inn.

"The fact that a disparity exists between rich and poor, in terms of food choice, is not new. There's sufficient data to prove that healthier food is more expensive and usually more perishable." [2:26]

--Cathy Nonas on Eating Matters

"Like so many things in the food industry, the use of antibiotics comes down to economics, which is really to say: it's about profit and loss." [5:57]

--Denis Stearns on Eating Matters

"Food is actually a big part of how we use our world. It is the world's largest user of fresh water, with climate change this is a huge factor in terms of how we're going to feed ourselves sustainably. Food is connected to everything. Literally." [19:13]

--Ricardo Salvador on Eating Matters


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