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It's berry season! On a fruity episode of Let's Get Real, Erica Wides discusses all the berries - black, blue, mul, cran....you get the point. Find out why she eats them off the vine, why blackberries are the holy grain and why supermarket berries are so bland. What does IHOP and Brooklyn high-rises have to do with berries? How has foodiness held berries hostage? Find out on Let's Get Real. This program was brought to you by Cain Vineyard & Winery.

"I'd rather eat street berries than industrially grown berries from A&P, that's for sure." [18:00]

"For me - the holy grail is the blackberry - the perfect blackberry. The blackberry is the ultimate berry reward." [20:00] --Erica Wides on Let's Get Real


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Most of us eat breakfast every day, but we rarely think of the the origins behind the meal. From etymology to cultural history - go deeper behind breakfast on this week's episode of A Taste of the Past as Linda Pelacchio is joined by author of "Breakfast, A History", Heather Arndt Anderson. Hear how the grab-and-go approach for breakfast has maintained over time and why grains have proven to be so important not only in the meal but in human evolution at large. Discover the early days of the Kellogg brothers as they searched a product that was easy to chew and ended up revolutionizing the way we eat breakfast. From corn to dairy and coffee to cocktails, dig deep into breakfast on A Taste of the Past. This program was sponsored by S. Wallace Edwards & Sons. Break music provided courtesy of Cookies.

"Breakfast was always a grab and go meal and that's a trend that's maintained over time." [6:00]

"In the Renaissance, egg cookery was a pretty big deal. They found hundreds of new ways to cook eggs." [21:00]

"Because of poor water quality in the Middle Ages, small beer was the most common beverage during breakfast." [24:00]

--Heather Arndt Anderson on A Taste of the Past


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On this episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio is in the studio with Tim Sullivan, sake educator and founder of the site UrbanSake.com. Tune in to hear about how rice processing and milling determines sake quality, why sake is more similar to beer than wine, and why sake is unlikely to give you a hangover. Did the tsunami affect sake quality and production in Japan? Is the sake contaminated by nuclear material? Tim says that sake production is monitored by the Japanese government and is completely safe! Sake doesn't necessarily need to accompany traditional Japanese food; it suits all types of cuisines and can compliment any meal. Learn more about the history of sake, and try some with your next dinner. This program has been brought to you by Hearst Ranch.

"Sake today can be very elegant. There's a lot of nuance. That's a modern phenomenon. That is something that has only been around for the last forty or fifty years. Sake itself has been around for 2,000 years."

"The more you mill down [the rice], the higher the quality. All the rice we eat is brown; if you're eating white rice, it has been milled."

--Tim Sullivan on A Taste of the Past


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